Molecular Infection Biology

Gastrointestinal infections are counted among the most common types of infectious diseases worldwide. In particular in developing countries, diarrhoeal diseases are still a leading course of death. Indeveloped countries, diarrhoeal diseases are under better control, but they still represent a very common affliction, especially among children and the elderly. Among the most important bacterial pathogens of food-animal origin are Salmonella, Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli, and enteropathogenic Yersinia species. Their primary route of transmission from animals to humans is through contaminated food. Once inside our bodies, they trigger an impressive range of different intestinal disorders from diarrhoea to acute infections of the small and large intestines – at times with severe consequences! Our primary focus is on Yersinia. We study the ways in which these bacteria adhere to the intestinal epithelium, penetrate it, and ultimately spread within the host.

Team

    Paweena Chaoprasid

    Paweena_Chaoprasid.jpg

    PhD Student

    +49 531 6181 5704

    +49 531 6181 5709

    Contact


    Curriculum Vitae

    Education and Employment

    * 2007 - 2011

    Bachelor of Science in Biotechnology, Faculty of Agro-Industry, Kasetsart University, Bangkok, Thailand - Thesis "Development of Fermented Soymilk Mixed with Fruit juice"

    * 2010

    Internship at National Pingtung University of Science and Technology, Taiwan - Projekt: "Capsid Gene of Porcine Circovirus Type 2 Recombinated by Escherichia coli Expression System"

    * 2011 - 2013

    Master of Science in Environmental Toxicology, Chulabhorn Graduate Institute Bangkok, Thailand - Thesis "Regulation and Role of the Zinc-Binding Protein, ZinT, in the Survival of Agrobacterium tumefaciens Under Metal and Oxidative Stresses"

    * 2014 - 2015

    Research assistant under Dr. Rojana Sukchawalit in Laboratory of Biotechnology, Chulabhorn Research Institute, Bangkok, Thailand - Project: "Metal homeostasis in Agrobacterium tumefaciens"

    * 2015 - 2016

    Research assistant under Dr. Rojana Sukchawalit in Laboratory of Biotechnology, Chulabhorn Research Institute, Bangkok, Thailand - Project: "Analysis of multidrug and resistance mechanism in soil and pathogenic bacteria"

    * since April 2016

    PhD Student at the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research in the department of Molecular Infection Biology of Prof. Dr. Petra Dersch

     

    Selected Publications:

    Dokpikul T, Chaoprasid P, Saninjuk K, Sirirakphaisarn S, Johnrod J, Nookabkaew S, Sukchawalit R, and Mongkolsuk S. Regulation of the cobalt/nickel efflux operon dmeRF in Agrobacterium tumefaciens and a link between the iron-sensing regulator RirA and cobalt/nickel resistance. Appl Environm Microbiol., Submitted (2016)

    Chaoprasid P, Dokpikul T, Johnrod J, Sirirakphaisarn S, Nookabkaew S, Sukchawalit R, and Mongkolsuk S (2016). Agrobacterium tumefaciens Zur regulates a high-affinity zinc uptake system, TroCBA, and a putative metal chaperone, YciC, along wiht ZinT and ZnuABC for survival under zinc-limiting conditions. Appl Environ Microbiol. AEM.00299-16.

    Chaoprasid P, Nookabkaew S, Sukchawalit R, and Mongkolsuk S (2015). Roles of Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58 ZntA and ZntB and the transcriptional regulator ZntR in controlling Cd2+/Zn2+/Co2+ resistance and the peroxide stress response. Microbiology, 161(9):1730-1740.

    Bhubhanil S, Sittipo P, Chaoprasid P, Nookabkaew S, Sukchawalit R, and Mongkolsuk S (2014). Control of zinc homeostasis in Agrobacterium tumefaciens via zur and the zinc uptake genes znuABC and zinT. Microbiology, 160(Pt11):2452-2463.

    Bhubhanil S, Chamsing J, Sittipo P, Chaoprasid P, Sukchawalit R, and Mongkolsuk S (2014). Roles of Agrobacterium tumefaciens membrane-bound ferritin (MbfA) in iron transport and resistance to iron under acidic conditions. Microbiology 160(Pt5):863-871.

     

     

Leader

  • Prof Dr Petra Dersch

    Petra Dersch

    Head of the Department Molecular Infection Biology

    +49 531 6181-5700

    +49 531 6181-5709

    Contact

    CV and Publications

News

Audio Podcast

  • Bakterien mit Thermometer - Vom Kühlschrank in den Körper
    Yersinien machen uns Bauchschmerzen. Wenn wir die Bakterien mit verseuchtem Fleisch zu uns nehmen, infizieren sie unsere Darmzellen und vermehren sich. Aber wie wissen die Yersinien, dass sie nicht mehr in der vergammelten Wurst sind sondern in unserem Körper? Die Antwort ist simpel: Die Bakterien haben ein Thermometer. Hören Sie zu, wie das funktioniert...