Forschungsprojekte (Drittmittel)

MAGICPAH

Molecular Approaches and MetaGenomic Investigations for optimizing Clean-up of PAH contaminated site

MAGICPAH aims to explore, understand and exploit the catalytic activities of microbial communities involved in the degradation of persistent PAHs. It will integrate (meta-) genomic studies with in-situ activity assessment based on stable isotope probing particularly in complex matrices of different terrestrial and marine environments. PAH degradation under various conditions of bioavailability will be assessed as to improve rational exploitation of the catalytic properties of bacteria for the treatment and prevention of PAH pollution. We will generate a knowledge base not only on the microbial catabolome for biodegradation of PAHs in various impacted environmental settings based on genome gazing, retrieval and characterization of specific enzymes but also on systems related bioavailability of contaminant mixtures. MAGICPAH takes into account the tremendous undiscovered metagenomic resources by the direct retrieval from genome/metagenome libraries and consequent characterization of enzymes through activity screens. These screens will include a highend functional small-molecule fluorescence screening platform and will allow us to directly access novel metabolic reactions followed by their rational exploitation for biocatalysis and the re-construction of biodegradation networks. Results from (meta-) genomic approaches will be correlated with microbial in situ activity assessments, specifically dedicated to identifying key players and key reactions involved in anaerobic PAH metabolism. Key processes for PAH metabolism particularly in marine and composting environments and the kinetics of MAGICPAH aims to explore, understand and exploit the catalytic activities of microbial communities involved in the degradation of persistent PAHs. It will integrate (meta-) genomic studies with in-situ activity assessment based on stable isotope probing particularly in complex matrices of different terrestrial and marine environments. PAH degradation under various conditions of bioavailability will be assessed as to improve rational exploitation of the catalytic properties of bacteria for the treatment and prevention of PAH pollution. We will generate a knowledge base not only on the microbial catabolome for biodegradation of PAHs in various impacted environmental settings based on genome gazing, retrieval and characterization of specific enzymes but also on systems related bioavailability of contaminant mixtures. MAGICPAH takes into account the tremendous undiscovered metagenomic resources by the direct retrieval from genome/metagenome libraries and consequent characterization of enzymes through activity screens. These screens will include a high-end functional small-molecule fluorescence screening platform and will allow us to directly access novel metabolic reactions followed by their rational exploitation for biocatalysis and the re-construction of biodegradation networks. Results from (meta-) genomic approaches will be correlated with microbial in situ activity assessments, specifically dedicated to identifying key players and key reactions involved in anaerobic PAH metabolism. Key processes for PAH metabolism particularly in marine and composting environments and the kinetics of aerobic degradation of PAH under different conditions of bioavailability will be assessed in model processes for PAH metabolism particularly in marine and composting environments and the kinetics of aerobic degradation of PAH under different conditions of bioavailability will be assessed in model systems, the rational manipulation of which will allow us to deduce correlations between system performance and genomic blueprint. The results will be used to improve treatment of PAH-contaminated sites.

Partner

 

Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research (HZI)

Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC)

Istituto per l’Ambiente Marino Costiero (IAMC)

Bangor University (UB)

Danmarks Tekniske Universitet (DTU)

Aecom

Genoscope / Institut de Génomique du CEA

Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ

National Environmental Research Institute at the University of Aarhus

Syndial Attività Diversificate SpA

Corporacion Corpogen

University Toronto

University of Leipzig

Projektleiter

Beteiligte Gruppen

Sprecher

Dietmar Pieper

Koordinator

Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung GmbH

Geldgeber / Förderer

EU - Europäische Union

CAREPNEUMO

Combating Antibiotics Resistant Pneumococci by Novel Strategies Based on in vivo and in vitro Host-Pathogen Interactions

CAREPNEUMO LogoThis collaborative project is aimed at understanding pneumococcus-host interactions for developing novel combat strategies.

The objective is to provide the basic knowledge needed for future development of novel prevention, diagnostic and treatment tools against pneumococcal infections. Emphasis will be placed on studies into fundamental molecular aspects of the interactions between S. pneumoniae and the human host, in particular the cell biology of bacteria. Experimental approaches will include the use of cell cultures and animal models of pneumococcal diseases, the study of virulence mechanisms, as well as the molecular epidemiology of drug resistance. CAREPNEUMO brings together 12 research organizations and one SME to achieve the objectives of the call. 

 

Carepneumo

is a collaborative research project within the Seventh Framework Programme funded by European Commission

from 01.03. 2009-28.02.2012.

(FP-Health-2007-B)

Contract No. 22311

The need to meet the challenge of Streptococcus pneumoniae

 

Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major cause of life-threatening infections such as pneumonia, meningitis and septicemia. The disease burden is high both in developed and developing countries, and the high-risk groups include children, elderly persons and immuno compromised patients. Approximately one million children under 5 years of age die from pneumococcal infections every year. In spite of the availability of a large number of antibiotics mortality and morbidity due to S. pneumoniae infections remain very high. The worldwide emergence of multi drug resistant S. pneumoniae strains is a big hindrance in treating pneumococcal invasive diseases. 

Another problem in combating pneumococcal infections is the genetic diversity of circulating strains. Based on the capsular polysaccharide there are more than 90 structurally and chemically different serotypes. It is known that different serotypes are prevalent in different geographical regions of the world. Although a 7-valent conjugate vaccine is currently available and has proved to be successful in preventing invasive disease caused by the vaccine serotype strains, the worldwide coverage is limited. Moreover, the use of this vaccine has resulted in a replacement by non-vaccine serotypes, which may make the current vaccine ineffective in the near future. The development of novel combat strategies is urgently needed and is a big challenge for the international pneumococcal community. This is also the global aim of the present proposal. 

There are three prerequisites to achieve this goal. It is important firstly to understand the distribution of serotypes and the occurrence of antibiotic resistance, secondly to identify and characterize new intervention targets by studying host-pathogen interactions, and thirdly to validate these targets in in vitro and in vivo infection models in order to identify potential candidates for prevention and therapy. 

This proposal would apply a multi-disciplinary approach that includes epidemiology, host-pathogen interactions, infection models and intervention strategies to combat antibiotic resistance problems among S. pneumoniae. 

 

Project Objectives

The objectives of this proposal were defined in order to obtain new knowledge on the molecular epidemiology of pneumococcal diseases and antibiotic resistance in different parts of the world, apply state-of-the-art technology to study host-pathogen interactions and apply innovative technologies for improving existing intervention strategies. Moreover, it would contribute towards the implementation of measures for prevention, control and treatment of pneumococcal diseases, especially those caused by multi-drug resistant strains. To achieve the purpose of this proposal, we have assembled a team with expertise required to fulfil the following objectives:

Objective 1:

Epidemiology of drug resistance and vaccine pressure replacement of S. pneumoniae

The major tasks of this objective will be to undertake monitoring of prevalent S. pneumoniae serotypes and their resistance profiles in various countries. This will also include the epidemiology of the serotype replacement in areas where pneumococcal vaccine is in use. Since the prevalence of serotypes as well as the magnitude and quality of drug resistance is different in different parts of the world, this objective will address the epidemiology of S. pneumoniae in six countries, which include an Asian and a South American country. These studies will determine the frequency of emergence of antibiotical resistance, particularly in those serotypes that have potential to spread rapidly in the community. The second part of this objective will be to determine the changes in pneumococcal disease after introduction of the 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine in different regions.

Objective 2: 

Analysis of host-pathogen interactions and identification of potential therapeutic targets and vaccine candidates

A prerequisite for developing new control strategies is the detailed understanding of the interaction between pneumococcus and the host cells. The analysis of host-pathogen interaction will include the prevalent virulent strains, which will be continuously identified in the work packages dealing with the epidemiological studies. The molecular mechanisms of host-pathogen interactions will be elucidated by applying genomics and cell biological approaches. Identification and characterization of the factors involved will be an important part of objective 2. The biological functions of these factors will be determined by using pathogenicity tests involving cell cultures as well as animal models of pneumococcal diseases.

Objective 3: 

Development of improved vaccine and intervention strategies

This objective deals with the development of new therapeutic and vaccine tools against pneumococcal infections based on the knowledge generated in objectives 1 and 2. For designing new therapeutics, the molecular basis of pathogen recognition through specific components of pneumococcal cell wall by host proteins will be identified by using a structural biological approach. In the area of vaccine development, this objective will deal with a novel polysaccharide glycolipid conjugate vaccine as well as the development of a protein-based universal vaccine.

 

Media

 

Publications

  1. Silva-Martín N, Retamosa MG, Maestro B, Bartual SG, Rodes MJ, García P, Sanz JM, Hermoso JA. (2014) Crystal structures of CbpF complexed with atropine and ipratropium reveal clues for the design of novel antimicrobials against Streptococcus pneumoniae.Biochim Biophys Acta. 1840(1):129-135. doi: 10.1016/j.bbagen.2013.09.006.
  2. Ribes S, Riegelmann J, Redlich S, Maestro B, de Waal B, Meijer EW, Sanz JM, Nau R. (2013) Multivalent Choline Dendrimers Increase Phagocytosis of Streptococcus pneumoniae R6 by Microglial Cells.Chemotherapy. 59(2):138-42. doi: 10.1159/000353439
  3. Saleh M, Bartual SG, Abdullah MR, Jensch I, Asmat TM, Petruschka L, Pribyl T, Gellert M, Lillig CH, Antelmann H, Hermoso JA, Hammerschmidt S (2013) Molecular architecture of Streptococcus pneumoniae surface thioredoxin-fold lipoproteins crucial for extracellular oxidative stress resistance and maintenance of virulence. AMBO Mol Med 5: 1852-70. 
  4. Gennaris A, Collet JF (2013) The 'captain of the men of death', Streptococcus pneumoniae, fights oxidative stress outside the 'city wall'. AMBO Mol Med 5: 1798-800. [Comment]
  5. Chan WT, Moreno-Cordoba I, Yeo CC, Espinosa M (2012) Toxin-antitoxin genes of the Gram-positive pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae: So few and yet so many.Microbiol Mol Biol Rev 76: 773-791
    2. Moreno-Cordoba I, Diago-Navarro E, Barendregt A, Heck AJ, Alfonso C, Diaz-Orejas R, Nieto C, Espinosa M (2012) The toxin-antitoxin proteins relBE2Spn of Streptococcus pneumoniae: characterization and association to their DNA target.Proteins 80: 1834-1846
  6. Asmat TM, Klingbeil K, Jensch I, Burchhardt G, Hammerschmidt S (2012) Heterologous expression of pneumococcal virulence factor PspC on the surface of Lactococcus lactis confers adhesive properties.Microbiology 158: 771-780 
  7. Djukic M, Munz M, Sorgel F, Holzgrabe U, Eiffert H, Nau R (2012) Overton's rule helps to estimate the penetration of anti-infectives into patients' cerebrospinal fluid.Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy 56: 979-988 
  8. Gamez G, Hammerschmidt S (2012) Combat pneumococcal infections: adhesins as candidates for protein-based vaccine development.Current Drug Targets 13: 323-337 
  9. Haertel T, Eylert E, Schulz C, Petruschka L, Gierok P, Grubmuller S, Lalk M, Eisenreich W, Hammerschmidt S (2012) Characterization of sentral carbon metabolism of Streptococcus pneumoniae by isotopologue profiling. The Journal of Biological Chemistry 287: 4260-4274 
  10. Horacio AN, Diamantino-Miranda J, Aguiar SI, Ramirez M, Melo-Cristino J (2012) Serotype changes in adult invasive pneumococcal infections in Portugal did not reduce the high fraction of potentially vaccine preventable infections.Vaccine 30: 218-224 
  11. Lioy VS, Machon C, Tabone M, Gonzalez-Pastor JE, Daugelavicius R, Ayora S, Alonso JC (2012) The zeta toxin induces a set of protective responses and dormancy.PloS one 7: e30282 
  12. Lorenzo-Diaz F, Solano-Collado V, Lurz R, Bravo A, Espinosa M (2012) Autoregulation of the synthesis of the MobM relaxase encoded by the promiscuous plasmid pMV158.Journal of Bacteriology 194: 1789-1799 
  13. Luettge M, Fulde M, Talay SR, Nerlich A, Rohde M, Preissner KT, Hammerschmidt S, Steinert M, Mitchell TJ, Chhatwal GS, Bergmann S (2012) Streptococcus pneumoniae induces exocytosis of Weibel-Palade bodies in pulmonary endothelial cells.Cellular Microbiology 14: 210-225 
  14. Redlich S, Ribes S, Schutze S, Czesnik D, Nau R (2012) Palmitoylethanolamide stimulates phagocytosis of Escherichia coli K1 and Streptococcus pneumoniae R6 by microglial cells.Journal of Neuroimmunology 244: 32-34 
  15. Ruiz-Maso JA, Lopez-Aguilar C, Nieto C, Sanz M, Buron P, Espinosa M, del Solar G (2012) Construction of a plasmid vector based on the pMV158 replicon for cloning and inducible gene expression in Streptococcus pneumoniae.Plasmid 67: 53-59 
  16. Artola-Recolons C, Llarrull LI, Lastochkin E, Mobashery S, Hermoso JA (2011) Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the lytic transglycosylase MltE from Escherichia coli.Acta Crystallographica Section F, Structural Biology and Crystallization Communications 67: 161-163 
  17. Asmat TM, Agarwal V, Rath S, Hildebrandt JP, Hammerschmidt S (2011) Streptococcus pneumoniae infection of host epithelial cells via polymeric immunoglobulin receptor transiently induces calcium release from intracellular stores.The Journal of Biological Chemistry 286: 17861-17869 
  18. Chan WT, Nieto C, Harikrishna JA, Khoo SK, Othman RY, Espinosa M, Yeo CC (2011) Genetic regulation of the yefM-yoeB toxin-antitoxin locus of Streptococcus pneumoniae.Journal of Bacteriology 193: 4612-4625 
  19. Garcia MT, Blazquez MA, Ferrandiz MJ, Sanz MJ, Silva-Martin N, Hermoso JA, de la Campa AG (2011) New alkaloid antibiotics that target the DNA topoisomerase I of Streptococcuspneumoniae.The Journal of Biological Chemistry 286: 6402-6413 
  20. Haertel T, Klein M, Koedel U, Rohde M, Petruschka L, Hammerschmidt S (2011) Impact of glutamine transporters on pneumococcal fitness under infection-related conditions.Infection and Immunity 79: 44-58 
  21. Hernandez-Rocamora VM, Reulen SW, de Waal B, Meijer EW, Sanz JM, Merkx M (2011) Choline dendrimers as generic scaffolds for the non-covalent synthesis of multivalent protein assemblies. Chem Commun (Camb) 47: 5997-5999 
  22. Kreikemeyer B, Gamez G, Margarit I, Giard JC, Hammerschmidt S, Hartke A, Podbielski A (2011) Genomic organization, structure, regulation and pathogenic role of pilus constituents in major pathogenic Streptococci and Enterococci. International Journal of Medical Microbiology (IJMM) 301: 240-251 
  23. Lorenzo-Diaz F, Dostal L, Coll M, Schildbach JF, Menendez M, Espinosa M (2011) The MobM relaxase domain of plasmid pMV158: thermal stability and activity upon Mn2+ and specific DNA binding. Nucleic Acids Research 39: 4315-4329 
  24. Maestro B, Novakova L, Hesek D, Lee M, Leyva E, Mobashery S, Sanz JM, Branny P (2011) Recognition of peptidoglycan and beta-lactam antibiotics by the extracellular domain of the Ser/Thr protein kinase StkP from Streptococcus pneumoniae.FEBS Letters 585: 357-363 
  25. Maestro B, Santiveri CM, Jimenez MA, Sanz JM (2011) Structural autonomy of a beta-hairpin peptide derived from the pneumococcal choline-binding protein LytA.Protein Engineering, Design & Selection (PEDS) 24: 113-122 
  26. Skoczynska A, Sadowy E, Bojarska K, Strzelecki J, Kuch A, Golebiewska A, Wasko I, Forys M, van der Linden M, Hryniewicz W (2011) The current status of invasive pneumococcal disease in Poland.Vaccine 29: 2199-2205 
  27. Agarwal V, Asmat TM, Dierdorf NI, Hauck CR, Hammerschmidt S (2010) Polymeric immunoglobulin receptor-mediated invasion of Streptococcus pneumoniae into host cells requires a coordinate signaling of SRC family of protein-tyrosine kinases, ERK, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase. The Journal of Biological Chemistry 285: 35615-35623 
  28. Aguiar SI, Brito MJ, Goncalo-Marques J, Melo-Cristino J, Ramirez M (2010) Serotypes 1, 7F and 19A became the leading causes of pediatric invasive pneumococcal infections in Portugal after 7 years of heptavalent conjugate vaccine use.Vaccine 28: 5167-5173 
  29. Eldholm V, Johnsborg O, Straume D, Ohnstad HS, Berg KH, Hermoso JA, Havarstein LS (2010) Pneumococcal CbpD is a murein hydrolase that requires a dual cell envelope binding specificity to kill target cells during fratricide.Molecular Microbiology 76: 905-917 
  30. Jensch I, Gamez G, Rothe M, Ebert S, Fulde M, Somplatzki D, Bergmann S, Petruschka L, Rohde M, Nau R, Hammerschmidt S (2010) PavB is a surface-exposed adhesin of Streptococcus pneumoniae contributing to nasopharyngeal colonization and airways infections.Molecular Microbiology 77: 22-43 
  31. Kaur SJ, Nerlich A, Bergmann S, Rohde M, Fulde M, Zahner D, Hanski E, Zinkernagel A, Nizet V, Chhatwal GS, Talay SR (2010) The CXC chemokine-degrading protease SpyCep of Streptococcus pyogenes promotes its uptake into endothelial cells.The Journal of Biological Chemistry 285: 27798-27805 
  32. Kuch A, Sadowy E, Skoczynska A, Hryniewicz W (2010) First report of Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype 6D isolates from invasive infections.Vaccine 28: 6406-6407 
  33. Lioy VS, Pratto F, de la Hoz AB, Ayora S, Alonso JC (2010) Plasmid pSM19035, a model to study stable maintenance in Firmicutes.Plasmid 64: 1-17 
  34. Lioy VS, Rey O, Balsa D, Pellicer T, Alonso JC (2010) A toxin-antitoxin module as a target for antimicrobial development.Plasmid 63: 31-39 
  35. Nau R, Sorgel F, Eiffert H (2010) Penetration of drugs through the blood-cerebrospinal fluid/blood-brain barrier for treatment of central nervous system infections.Clinical Microbiology Reviews 23: 858-883 
  36. Nieto C, Sadowy E, de la Campa AG, Hryniewicz W, Espinosa M (2010) The relBE2Spn toxin-antitoxin system of Streptococcus pneumoniae: role in antibiotic tolerance and functional conservation in clinical isolates.PloS One 5: e11289 
  37. Perez-Dorado I, Gonzalez A, Morales M, Sanles R, Striker W, Vollmer W, Mobashery S, Garcia JL, Martinez-Ripoll M, Garcia P, Hermoso JA (2010) Insights into pneumococcal fratricide from the crystal structures of the modular killing factor LytC.Nature Structural & Molecular Biology 17: 576-581 
  38. Perez-Dorado I, Sanles R, Gonzalez A, Garcia P, Garcia JL, Martinez-Ripoll M, Hermoso JA (2010) Crystallization of the pneumococcal autolysin LytC: in-house phasing using novel lanthanide complexes.Acta crytallographica Section F, Structural Biology and Crystallization Communications 66: 448-451 
  39. Ribes S, Adam N, Ebert S, Regen T, Bunkowski S, Hanisch UK, Nau R (2010) The viral TLR3 agonist poly(I:C) stimulates phagocytosis and intracellular killing of Escherichia coli by microglial cells.Neuroscience Letters 482: 17-20 
  40. Ribes S, Ebert S, Regen T, Agarwal A, Tauber SC, Czesnik D, Spreer A, Bunkowski S, Eiffert H, Hanisch UK, Hammerschmidt S, Nau R (2010) Toll-like receptor stimulation enhances phagocytosis and intracellular killing of nonencapsulated and encapsulated Streptococcus pneumoniae by murine microglia.Infection and Immunity 78: 865-871
  41. Ribes S, Ebert S, Regen T, Czesnik D, Scheffel J, Zeug A, Bunkowski S, Eiffert H, Hanisch UK, Hammerschmidt S, Nau R (2010) Fibronectin stimulates Escherichia coli phagocytosis by microglial cells.Glia 58: 367-376 
  42. Ruiz-Cruz S, Solano-Collado V, Espinosa M, Bravo A (2010) Novel plasmid-based genetic tools for the study of promoters and terminators in Streptococcus pneumoniae and Enterococcusfaecalis.Journal of Microbiological Methods 83: 156-163 
  43. Sadowy E, Kuch A, Gniadkowski M, Hryniewicz W (2010) Expansion and evolution of the Streptococcus pneumoniae Spain9V-ST156 clonal complex in Poland.Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy 54: 1720-1727 
  44. Silva-Martin N, Molina R, Angulo I, Mancheno JM, Garcia P, Hermoso JA (2010) Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the catalytic module of endolysin from Cp-7, a phage infecting Streptococcus pneumoniae. Acta Crystallographica Section F, Structural Biology and Crystallization Communications 66: 670-673 
  45. Zahlten J, Steinicke R, Opitz B, Eitel J, N'Guessan P D, Vinzing M, Witzenrath M, Schmeck B, Hammerschmidt S, Suttorp N, Hippenstiel S (2010) TLR2- and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 2-dependent Kruppel-like factor 2 expression downregulates NF-kappa B-related gene expression.Journal of Immunology 185: 597-604 
  46. Carrolo M, Pinto FR, Melo-Cristino J, Ramirez M (2009) Pherotypes are driving genetic differentiation within Streptococcus pneumoniae.BMC Microbiology 9: 191 
  47. Lorenzo-Diaz F, Espinosa M (2009) Lagging-strand DNA replication origins are required for conjugal transfer of the promiscuous plasmid pMV158.Journal of Bacteriology 191: 720-727
  48. Lorenzo-Diaz F, Espinosa M (2009) Large-scale filter mating assay for intra- and inter-specific conjugal transfer of the promiscuous plasmid pMV158 in Gram-positive bacteria.Plasmid 61: 65-70

Partner

 

Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research

RWTH Aachen, Germany

National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece

National Medicines Institute, Poland

Instituto de Medicina Molecular, Portugal

Hospital de Pediatría "Prof. Dr. Juan P. Garrahan", Argentina

Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, India

University of Glasgow, UK

Consejo Superior de Investigadones Científicas, Spain

Ernst Moritz Arndt University, Greifswald, Germany

University Miguel Hernández, Spain

University Hospital, Basel

Protea Vaccine Technologies Ltd.

Beteiligte Gruppen

Koordinator

Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research

Geldgeber / Förderer

EU - Europäische Union

EATRIS

The European Advanced Transnational Research InfraStructure in Medicine

Medical translation of basic research discoveries into clinical applications has turned out to be a major challenge for the European research area. A major bottleneck is the fragmented nature of basic and clinical research infrastructure, leading to unnecessary delays and difficulties in drug development or the implementation of new diagnostic strategies.
EATRIS – European Advanced Translational Research InfraStructure in Medicine – is a strategic EU project that aims to offer a research infrastructure to help overcome bottlenecks currently hampering the transfer both of basic research findings into clinical application and of clinical observations to basic research. In a unique partnership, governmental and scientific organisations form the EATRIS consortium to develop a master plan for setting up the provision of an infrastructure on a European level. The EATRIS idea is to organize under one roof multidisciplinary, creative work atmosphere, open labs, comprehensive modern equipment, scientific and legal expertise with central facilities and services and a translational research curriculum.
EATRIS will enable a faster and more efficient translation of research findings into the development of innovative strategies for the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of diseases which are of particular relevance for European member states and that have a high medical and economic burden.

Partner

 

University of Copenhagen, Cluster for Molecular Imaging (CMI), Denmark

Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), Finland

German Cancer Research Centre (DKFZ), Germany

Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research (HZI), Germany

Istituto Superiore di Sanità (ISS), Italy

Centre for Translational Molecular Medicine (CTMM), The Netherlands

University of Oslo (UiO), Norway

University Hospital Vall d'Hebron (FIR-HUVH), Spain

Beteiligte Gruppen

Sprecher

Regina Becker

Koordinator

Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research (DE)

Geldgeber / Förderer

EU - Europäische Union

EU-OPENSCREEN

European Infrastructure of Open Screening Platforms for Chemical Biology

EU-Openscreen 2012EU-OPENSCREEN, the European Infrastructure of Open Screening Platforms for Chemical Biology, integrates high- throughput screening platforms, chemical libraries, chemical resources for hit discovery and optimisation, bio- and cheminformatics support, and a database containing screening results, assay protocols, and chemical information.
These platforms – offering the most advanced technologies – will be used by European researchers from academia and SMEs in order to identify compounds affecting new targets. Open access to an integrated infrastructure for Chemical Biology will thus satisfy the needs for new bioactive compounds in many fields of the Life Sciences (e.g. human and veterinary medicine, systems biology, biotechnology, agriculture and nutrition).

Partner

 

Research Center for Molecular Medicine of the Austrian Academy of Sciences (CeMM)

Institute of Molecular Genetics AS CR (IMG)

Technical University of Denmark (DTU)

European Molecular Biology Laboratory – Outstation European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI)

Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM)

CNRS - Délégation Alsace

Leibniz-Institut für Molekulare Pharmakologie (FMP)

Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung (HZI)

Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine (MDC)

Interdisciplinary Center for Biomolecular Studies and Industrial Applications (CISI)

IRBM for Collezione Nazionale di Composti Chimici e Centro Screening (CNCCS)

Biomedical Research Foundation, Acadamy of Athens (BRFAA)

Netherlands Cancer Institute (NKI)

Universitet i Oslo (UiO)

Institute of Medical Biology of PAS (IMB)

Fundacio Privada Parc Cientific de Barcelona (PCB)

Institute of Chemistry Timisoara of Romanian Academy (ICT)

Umeå University (UmU)

Universiteit Ghent

Sprecher

Ronald Frank

Koordinator

Foschungsverbund Berlin e.V. (FMP)(DE)

Geldgeber / Förderer

EU - Europäische Union

Heptromic

Genomic predictors and oncogenic drivers in hepatocellular carcinoma

Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) accounts for more than 90% of liver cancers, and is a major health problem. Its incidence is growing and with more than 700,000 annual cases worldwide -50,000 in Europe-, it is the 3rd cause of cancer-related mortality. Most patients are diagnosed at advanced stages with dismal survival rates lower than 1 year, even after sorafenib, the sole systemic therapy available. The main goal of the HEPTROMIC project is to produce breakthrough knowledge in two critical aspects of HCC research: prognostic prediction and identification of oncogenic drivers susceptible for intervention, leading towards more personalized treatment algorithms. The HEPTROMIC Consortium proposes a 3-year translational research study bringing together an outstanding team of researchers with clinical and genomic expertise along with cutting-edge technology. Eight partners -six academic and two SMEs- will address the following objectives by applying high-end transcriptome, methylome and deep sequencing technology in a large set of 1,140 human samples: Objective 1) Genomic characterization of poor prognosis subclass of hepatocellular carcinoma. Objective 2) Identification of driver oncogenic events as potential treatment targets. Findings obtained will be confirmed in sophisticated experimental models that closely mimics human liver cancer. Objective 3) Design of prognostic devices for clinical translation. This transfer of knowledge will be led by SMEs with entrepreneurial management skills with experience in creating new products increasing European competitiveness and boosting the innovative capacity of industries. Overall, the Consortium foresees impacts on improved patient survival by refining prognosis and decision-making, identifying targets amenable for selective therapies and by improving the allocation of resources. In summary, HEPTROMIC will strength links between the academic and industry spheres, ultimately contributing to reduce liver cancer mortality. 

Partner

 

Institut D’Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS). Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain

Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM). Paris, France

Fundació Privada Institut d'Investigació Biomèdica de Bellvitge (IDIBELL). Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain

Helmholtz Zentrum Für Infektionsforschung (HZI). Braunschweig, Germany

Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei tumori (INT). Milan, Italy

Broad Institute, Harvard. Boston, USA

Diagenode. Liège, Belgium

TcLand Expression SA. Nantes, France

Projektleiter

Beteiligte Gruppen

Es gibt keine Ergebnisse

Sprecher

Lars Zender

Koordinator

Consorci Institut D’Investigacions

Geldgeber / Förderer

EU - Europäische Union

NOPERSIST

Novel strategies for the prevention and control of persistent infections

Persistent infections such as Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), tuberculosis´(TB) in humans and para-tuberculosis (ParaTB)-, mycoplasma- and Haemophilus-infections in farm animals are global health problems of immense social and economic importance . HIV-1 affects about 40 million people and M. tuberculosis infection is even higher world-wide. M. tuberculosis is a slowly replicating bacillus that resides intracellularly within phagosomes of macrophages and commonly causes latent infections of the lung and in about 5% of the infected individuals it leads to active disease. Co-infection with M. tuberculosis is estimated in about one-third of HIV-1 infected subjects. Indeed, the risk of developing M. tuberculosis as an opportunistic infection is increased up to 200-fold in HIV-1 + subjects. Globally, there are more than 14 million persons dually infected with TB and HIV. Drug resistance to HIV-treatment and appearance of multiple-drug resistance (MDR) and off late of Extra-Drug Resistance (XDR) strains of M. tuberculosis , the causative agent of human TB is steadily leading to a hopeless situation as far as the therapy is concerned. To make things worse, there is no effective vaccine available against HIV. M. bovis BCG, the only vaccine available against TB, has shown highly variable efficiency and has been very often ineffective. Its use has been discontinued in several countries. John’s diseases or para-tuberculosis is a chronic , debilitating entritis of ruminants leading to serious production-limiting consequences world-wide. Similarly, procine respiratory infections caused by Mycoplasma and Haemophilus species are emerging pathogens already causing massive economic losses to the European pig industry which have been estimated to be in excess of 1 billion Euro per year. Diagnostics of all the these infections mentioned above is extremely difficult and time-consuming and no efficient, cost effective tests are available for an early diagnosis of these infections. 

Partner

 

Unternehmen

LIONEX Diagnostics & Therapeutics GmbH (Coordinator),

Vichem Chemie Research Ltd,

Prionics AG,

Gesellschaft für Innovative Veterinärdiagnostik mbH,

Staatliche Forschungeinrichtungen

Animal Health and Veterinary Laboratories Agency,

Karolinska Institutet

Fundació Institut d'Investigació en Ciències de la Salut Germans Trias i Pujol,

University of Florence,

Prince Leopold Institute of Tropical Medicine

Projektleiter

Beteiligte Gruppen

Sprecher

Rolf Müller

Koordinator

LIONEX (DE)

Geldgeber / Förderer

EU - Europäische Union

TRANSVAC

European Network of Vaccine Research and Development

TRANSVAC aims to accelerate the pharmaceutical and clinical development of promising vaccine candidates by bridging the gap between academic research and clinical trails through carefully managing the advancement of promising vaccine candidates from preclinical animal experiments to early proof-of principle studies in humans. Transvac will be the European driving force for vaccine development and will be open and accessible to those interested parties, who are capable of contributing key elements of the strategy, allowing them to leverage the value of the whole consortium. This consortium will comprise the major European stakeholders with an interest in vaccine development, from the scientific community in Europe to the European vaccine manufacturers. 

Partner

 

European Vaccine Initiative (EVI), Germany

Biomedical Primate Research Centre (BPRC), The Netherlands

Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research (HZI), Germany

Vakzine Projekt Management GmbH (VPM), Germany

LIONEX GmbH, Germany

ID-Lelystad (IDL), The Netherlands

UK Health Protection Agency, Centre for Emergency Preparedness and Response (CEPR, formerly CAMR), UK

UK Health Protection Agency, National Institute for Biological Standards and Control (NIBSC), UK

Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology (MPIIB), Germany

University of Regensburg (UREG), Germany

London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (LSHTM), UK

University of Oxford, The Jenner Institute  (UOXF), UK

University of Lausanne (UNIL), Switzerland

TuBerculosis Vaccine Initiative (TBVI), The Netherlands

Projektleiter

Beteiligte Gruppen

Sprecher

Carlos Guzman

Koordinator

European Vaccine Initiative (DE)

Geldgeber / Förderer

EU - Europäische Union

EMTRAIN

European Medicines Research Training Network

The European Medicines Research Training Network (EMTRAIN) will establish a sustainable, pan-European platform for education and training (E&T) covering the whole life-cycle of medicines research, from basic science through clinical development to pharmacovigilance.

This will be achieved by integrating the strengths and competencies of the ESFRI BMS Infrastructures, the EFPIA companies, the current and future IMI E&T programmes as well as other scientific projects.

Partner

EFPIA Partners

AstraZeneca
Genzyme
Novartis
Bayer
Pfizer
Roche
GSK, GlaxoSmithKline Research and Development Ltd.
UCB
Novo Nordisk
Sanofi
Boehringer Ingelheim
Janssen Pharmaceutica
Orion
Almirall
Lundbeck
Esteve

 

Public Partners

MUW (ECRIN partner)
Karolinska Institute (EATRIS partner)
KUH (ECRIN partner)
UniMan (BBMRI partner)
Inserm (ECRIN partner)
EMBL-EBI (ELIXIR partner)
MUG (BBMRI partner)
GIE-CERBM (Infrafrontier partner)
HMGU (Infrafrontier partner)
UOX (Instruct partner)
MRC-HU (ECRIN partner)
HZI (EATRIS partner)

Sprecher

Rebecca Ludwig

Koordinator

AstraZeneca (SE)

Geldgeber / Förderer

EU - Europäische Union

OPTISTEM

Optimization of Stem cell Therapy for degenerative Epithelial and Muscle Diseases

OptiStem is an EU-funded research project that brings together stem cell biologists and clinical experts from across Europe investigating stem cells in skeletal muscle and epithelia. OptiStem combines basic research about stem cells with pre-clinical work and clinical trials. All these areas of research are vital to understand how to use stem cells in the fight against disease. It will be investigated how stem cells could be used to treat degenerative diseases that damage skeletal muscle or epithelia such as skin or the surface of the eye.

Partner

 

France

Institut nationale de la santé et de la recherche médicale (INSERM)

Pasteur Institute

Germany

Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research

Miltenyi Biotec GmBH

Italy

E. Medea Scientific Institute

FIRC Institute of Molecular Oncology Foundation

MolMed S.p.A.

San Rafaelle del Monte Tabor Foundation

University of Milan

University of Modena

Spain

University Pompeu Fabra

Switzerland

Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois CHUV

Ecole Polytechnique Fédéral de Lausanne

UK

Cancer Research UK

Dando & Colucci LLC

King’s College London

University of Edinburgh

University of Oxford

 

Sprecher

Regina Becker

Koordinator

University of Milan (IT)

Geldgeber / Förderer

EU - Europäische Union

INFRAFRONTIER

The European infrastructure for phenotyping and archiving of model mammalian genomes

Logo INFRAFRONTIERThe European infrastructure for phenotyping and archiving of model mammalian genomesMedically related Life Sciences use the mouse as a model system to understand the molecular basis of health and disease in humans. An essential task for Biomedical Sciences in the 21st century will be the functional analysis of mouse models for every gene in the mammalian genome. More than 30000 mutations in ES cells and numerous genetic reference populations consisting of thousands of inbred mouse strains with segregating genetic backgrounds will be engineered and thousands of mouse models for human diseases will become available over the next years by the collaborative efforts of the International Mouse Knockout Consortium.

The major bottlenecks identified by the user community will be proper characterization (Mouse Clinics), archiving and dissemination of mouse disease models to the research laboratories. The current capacities, governance structures and funding strategies of existing infrastructures will not be able to serve the upcoming urgent needs. Existing facilities across Europe can only offer capacity for the analysis and dissemination of a few hundred disease models per year.  

Thus it is imperative to organize and establish now an efficient distributed infrastructure for the phenotyping, archiving and dissemination of mouse models on a well-concerted, large-scale and pan-European level. This will be a prerequisite for maintaining Europe's leading role in the functional annotation of the mouse genome. Infrafrontier will guarantee the accessibility of mouse models and will be essential to facilitate their exploitation.

Infrafrontier is an Integrated Project of the 7th Framework Programme of the European Commission, comprising 7 work packages, 9 countries and 14 partners.

WP5 – Draft Engineering Specifications

Prof. Dr. Klaus Schughart, Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research

Objectives

1) Development of detailed specifications for designing and building or upgrading of mouse holding and breeding facilities, archiving and distribution facilities and mouse phenotyping facilities.

2) To document these specifications in a formal publication.

 

Partner

 

Ministries and research councils

Projektleiter

Beteiligte Gruppen

Koordinator

Prof. Dr. Martin Hrabé de Angelis, Helmholtz Zentrum München - German Research Center for Environmental Health, Neuherberg/München, Germany

Geldgeber / Förderer

EU - Europäische Union

BACSIN

Bacterial abiotic cellular stress and survival improvement network

BACSIN is a 16-member consortium with the main focus to improve rational exploitation of the catalytic properties of bacteria for the treatment and prevention of environmental pollution. Current application of bacteria in the environment is hindered by the lack of knowledge on the effects of stresses on cellular activity, most importantly abiotic stresses prevailing on site (e.g., desiccation or nutrient starvation), stresses as a result of pollution itself (e.g., toxicity), and those during strain preparation and formulation.
BACSIN proposes four iterative poles of research and technology to overcome this hindrance for subsequent improved microbial usage. The 1st pole will investigate genome-wide catabolic and stress expression in a set of different pollutant degrading bacteria (the BACSINs ). Key cellular factors and regulatory networks determining the interplay between stress-survival and pollutant catabolism will be unveiled, and faithful predictive models for cell behaviour produced. The 2nd pole will study stress resistance, survival and activity of BACSINs in real polluted environments, via microcosms and in situ traps, plant roots and leaves, while accentuating possible effects on native communities.

 

Partner

 

UNIL - University of Lausanne (UNIL), Department of Fundamental Microbiology, Lausanne, Switzerland

BIRD - Bio-Iliberis R&D, Armilla (Granada), Spain

CSIC - Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC),
Centro Nacional de Biotecnología (CNB), Madrid, Spain

ETCZ - Aecom, Prague, Czech Republic

UGOT - Götebourg Universitet,
Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Göteborg, Sweden

HZI - Helmotz-Zentrum für Infektionsfonsforschung GmbH,
Department: Microbial Interactions and Processes, Braunschewig, Germany

KULeuven - Katholieke Universiteit Leuven,
Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Heverlee, Belgium

NIOO-KNAW - Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW), Heteren
The Netherlands

SLU - Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences,
Uppsala BioCenter, Department of Microbiology, Uppsala, Sweden

TUBS - Carolo-Wilhelmina Technische Universität zu Braunschweig,
Institute of Microbiology, Braunschweig, Germany

UFZ - Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ,
Department Bioremediation, Leipzig, Germany

VU - Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam,
Department Molecular Cell Physiology, Amsterdam, The Netherlands

WU - Wageningen Universiteit, Laboratory of Microbiology,
Wageningen, The Netherlands


EC-JRC - European Union Represented by the European Commission-
Joint Research Centre, Institute for Environment and Sustainability, Ispra (VA), Italy

Belair - Remy Enga Luye, Belair Biotech SA, Geneva, Switzerland

ECO - Ekoloski inzenjering d.o.o., Kukci Nova Vas, Croatia

Projektleiter

Beteiligte Gruppen

Sprecher

Dietmar Pieper

Koordinator

Université de Lausanne (CH)

Geldgeber / Förderer

EU - Europäische Union

FAST-XDR-DETECT

Development of a two-approach plate system for the fast and simultaneous detection of MDR and XDR M.tuberculosis

Tuberculosis (TB) continues being a leading cause of death due to a single infectious disease agent. The HIV/AIDS pandemic and the emergence of drug resistance are compounding factors that hinder the control of the disease. Associated with the problem of drug resistance is the emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, defined as strains resistant to at least isoniazid and rifampicin, the most valuable drugs in the treatment of the disease. More recently, the appearance of extensively drug resistant (XDR) strains has been reported. These strains, in addition to being MDR, are also resistant to key second-line drugs. Patients, especially HIV patients, harbouring XDR strains have virtually no treatment options. New and improved methods for fast detection of drug resistance are urgently needed. This project will develop a twofold-approach system for the fast and simultaneous detection of MDR and XDR strains based on a rapid phenotypic assay and a genotypic test. Colorimetric methods - which have been previously validated by our group for first-line drug susceptibility testing - will be set up for key second-line drugs involved in XDRTB. The molecular method will be based on a modification of the novel technology named detection of immobilized amplified product in one phase system. This versatile molecular approach   - which in a previous EU project proved reliable and user-friendly for the detection of rifampicin resistance - will be further improved and set up for the detection of MDR strains. The developed tools will be then validated in different settings and prospectively evaluated in target populations. The project will contribute to the currently available tools for rapid detection of drug resistant TB and will introduce new tools for the detection of the recently-described and highly-lethal XDRTB. It will also contribute to our knowledge on the mechanisms of M. tuberculosis resistance to second-line anti- drugs.
 

Partner

 

Prince Leopold Institute of Tropical Medicine, Belgium

Helmholtz Zentrum für Infektionsforschung GmbH, Germany

Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control, Sweden

Lionex GmbH, Germany

Infectology Center of Latvia, Latvia

CorpoGen, Colombia

INEI-ANLIS Inst. Malbrán, Argentina

Hospital Cetrángolo, Argentina

Projektleiter

Beteiligte Gruppen

Es gibt keine Ergebnisse

Sprecher

Helmut Blöcker

Koordinator

Prince Leopold Institute of Tropical Medicine (BE)

Geldgeber / Förderer

EU - Europäische Union

PANFLUVAC

Efficacious vaccine formulation system for prophylactic control of influenza pandemics

Influenza epidemics remain a burden to both human health and national economies, as witnessed by the recent advance of pathogenic avian H5N1 influenza virus. While the numbers of human deaths in Europe have remained relatively low, the presence of such cases in Turkey demonstrates the danger posed by this virus. Now that H5N1 virus has been detected in wild birds in Europe, the PANFLUVAC consortium is committed to creating an efficacious vaccine against this virus, to provide strong protection in a pandemic situation.
The overall aim of PANFLUVAC is to construct vaccine delivery systems for intranasal and parenteral vaccines. New H5N1 vaccines are based on a current subunit vaccine construction – for immediate evaluation – as well as well-established virosome technology for future development within the project. Pre-clinical evaluation will also permit comparison of the new intranasal vaccines with whole virus vaccine. The vaccine potency will be enhanced by novel adjuvants – ISCOM, glycolipids and lipopeptide adjuvants biosafe for humans - known to promote the dendritic cell activity critical for efficient induction of immune defences. This approach offers both antigen sparing potential and immunopotentiation characteristics. biosafe for humans. With the ISCOM having been employed with experimental influenza vaccines, this will allow the new H5N1 vaccines to be fast-tracked in their development. Accordingly, PANFLUVAC will generate its first H5N1 vaccine for intranasal evaluation within the first 18 months of the project.
The PANFLUVAC project is also designed to facilitate rapid modification of the vaccine in the face of virus drift. Within the preclinical evaluation, the new vaccines will be tested for the degree of heterotypic cross protection they offer. PANFLUVAC offers a generic vaccine development system to provide safe and efficacious vaccines against influenza, fitting with the “Community Influenza Pandemic Preparedness and Response Planning".

Partner

 

Schweizerische Eidgenossenschaft, Institute of Virology and Immunoprophylaxis (IVI) FDEA/FVO: Federal Veterinary Office of the Federal Department of Economic Affairs

Crucell

National Institute for Biological Standards and Control, (NIBSC)

Retroscreen Virology Ltd

University of Bergen, The Influenza Centre, The Gade Institute

Health Protection Agency, Respiratory & Neurological Virus Laboratory, Respiratory Unit HPA

Istituto Superiore di Sanitá (ISS), Department of Infectious, Immune-mediated and Parasitic Diseases

Helmholtz, Zentrum für infektionsforschung

SCIPROM Scientific Project Management

 

Sprecher

Carlos Guzman

Koordinator

Federal Veterinary Office (CH)

Geldgeber / Förderer

EU - Europäische Union

Clinigene

European Network for the Advancement of Clinical Gene Transfer and Therapy

The field of gene therapy has matured and the prospects are exciting and hopeful, particularly since some treatmentshave now been shown to be effective in the clinic. However, precise quality and safety standards for clinical genetransfer have yet to be defined. In this context, defining optimal methods for the production of standard vector systemswould pave the way for accelerated development and improved safety. This would be of enormous value to industry,individual investigators and regulators.The goal of this proposal is the creation of a European Network for the Advancement of Clinical Gene Transferand Therapy (CLINIGENE) integrating multidisciplinary research and development in gene therapy as well asmobilising all major stake holders involved in the development of gene therapy medicinal products: academia,industry, regulatory bodies, clinics and patients. The network will generate platform databases for particular vectorswith respect to their safety and efficacy to ensure product manufacturing according to well-defined quality and safetystandards in order to accelerate clinical trials. This will be achieved by compiling all available information and thenranking test and control methods by comparison, and through validation by expert partners.The joint programme of activities comprises1. Integration activites: sharing facilities, exchange and high-level training of personnel, e-communication andcollaboration with the ESGT.2. Research activities: six horizontal activities serving integration towards the generation of reference/standard profiledata-bases - AAV, γ-retrovirus, lentivirus, adenovirus, genetically-modified cells & non-viral vectors - and fourvertical activities defining a path to optimised clinical protocols - quality and efficacy (manufacture), safety (pharmtoxand virus safety); pre-clinical models and novel assessment tools, clinical trials.3. Dissemination activities: training, high-level education, communication (including a web-site with scientific &medical data-bases) and management of shared information and intellectual property rights.Within a strong integration plan, the Network is planning for flexibility in order to adapt to : (i) progresses recorded ina stepwise manner and (ii) novelty arising during the CLINIGENE workprogramme.

Partner

 

Academic Partners

FCSR-TIGET, San Raffaele Telethon Institute for Gene Therapy, Milano, Italy

Institute of Ophthalmology, University College London,
Div. of Molecular Therapy, London, United Kingdom

TIGEM - Telethon Institute of Genetics and Medicine, Napoli, Italy

Orphanet - INSERM SC11
Hôpital Broussais, Paris, France

Medizinische Hochschule Hannover
Dept. Experimental Hematology, Hannover, Germany

INSERM, France

CBATEG - Autonomeous Univ. of Barcelona, Centre de Biotec. Animal i Teràpia,
Bellaterra, Spain

Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic,
Institute of Molecular Genetics,
Prague, Czech Republic

IBET - Instituto de Biologia Experimental e Technologica, Oeiras, Portugal

Paul-Ehrlich-Institut, Langen, Germany

Ecole Normale Supérieure de Cachan, Cachan Cedex, France

Royal Holloway & Bedford University, School of Biological Science,
Egham, Surrey, United Kingdom

Mayo Clinic, Molecular Medicine Programme, Rochester, United States

Karolinska Institutet, Department of Medicine, Huddinge University Hospital,
Stockholm, Sweden

Technischen Universität München, Institut für Experimentelle Onkologie und Therapieforschung, München, Germany

Helmoltz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany

Klinik für Neurologie der Universität zu Köln,
Labors für Gentherapie & Molekulares Imaging am MPI für Neurologische Forschung, Köln, Germany

APHP - UMR 7087, UPMC/CNRS-CERVI, Hôpital de la Pitié, Paris, France

University of Ulm, Division of Gene Therapy, Ulm, Germany

Institut de Biotechnologie - Univ. de Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland

Genethon, Evry, France

CNRS, UMR 8121, Institut Gustave-Roussy, Villejuif, France

CHU Hotel Dieu Nantes, Laboratoire Therapie Genique, Nantes, France

The Hebrew University, Hadassah Medical School, Jerusalem, Israel

ISTEM (Unité INSERM), Evry Cedex, France

INSERM, Faculté de Sciences Pharma. et Biologiques, Paris, France

German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), NCT-Heidelberg im Otto-Meyerhof-Zentrum, Heidelberg, Germany

University of Eastern Finland, A.I.Virtanen Institute, Kuopio, Finland

Industry Partners

Bioalliance Pharma, Paris, France

Bioreliance Ltd, Stirling, Scotland, United Kingdom

CellGenix, Freiburg, Germany

CleanCells, Bouffere, France

Epixis, Paris, France

Genosafe, Evry, France

Oxford BioMedica, Oxford

Plasmid Factory, Bielefeld, Germany

Transgene, Strasbourg, France

 

Sprecher

Hansjörg Hauser

Koordinator

École normale supérieure de Cachan (F)

Geldgeber / Förderer

EU - Europäische Union

EUMODIC

The European Mouse Disease Clinic: A distributed phenotyping resource for studiying human disease

As a first step towards a comprehensive functional annotation of the mouse genome, EUMODIC will undertake a primary phenotype assessment of up to 650 mouse mutant lines. In addition, a number of the mutant lines will be subject to a more in depth secondary phenotype assessment.
The EUMODIC consortium is made up of 18 laboratories across Europe who are experts in the field of mouse functional genomics and phenotyping and have a track record of successful collaborative research in EUMORPHIA. The EUMODIC consortium will build on the work in the EUMORPHIA project that delivered a comprehensive database ' EMPReSS - of Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) that can be used to determine the phenotype of a mouse. EUMODIC has developed a selection of these screens, EMPReSSslim, which is structured for comprehensive, primary, high throughput phenotyping of large numbers of mice.
We will also adopt innovative approaches to the generation and assessment of cohorts of age-matched mutants and controls for phenotyping. Primary phenotype assessment using EMPReSSslim will be undertaken in four large-scale phenotyping centres at the GSF, Germany; ICS, France; MRC Harwell, UK and the Sanger Institute, UK. Mutant lines will be made available from another EU initiative, the EUCOMM (European Conditional Mouse Mutagenesis) project which aims to produce conditional mutations in 20,000 mouse genes.
A distributed network of centres with in depth expertise in a number of phenotyping domains will undertake more complex, secondary phenotyping screens and apply them to a subset of the mice which have shown interesting phenotypes in the primary screen. The partners will also develop technologies to refine EMPReSSslim and improve throughput of mouse phenotyping. A key element will be the continued development of bioinformatics resources to store the phenotype information and link them to existing database resources.

Partner

 

MRC Harwell, UK

Institut Clinique de la Souris, France

Helmholtz Zentrum München, Germany

The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, UK

Helmholtz-Centre for Infection Research, Germany

National Research Council, Italy

University of Manchester, UK

European Molecular Biology Laboratory Monterotondo, Italy

Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, Spain

Ani.Rhone-Alpes, France

Tel Aviv University, Israel

Autonomous University of Barcelona, Spain

Center for Integrative Genomics, Switzerland

Institut De Transgenose, France

University of Cambridge, UK

Telethon Institute of Genetics and Medicine, Italy

Research Centre "Alexander Fleming", Greece

Beteiligte Gruppen

Sprecher

Andreas Lengeling

Koordinator

MRC Mammalian Genetics Unit (UK)

Geldgeber / Förderer

EU - Europäische Union

ASSIST

Comprehensive approach to understand streptococcal diseases and their sequelae to develop innovative strategies for diagnosis, therapy, prevention and control

Overview

The disease burden of group A streptococcal infections worldwide is extremely high. More than 600 million persons, mostly children, suffer from streptococcal pharyngitis each year. There are 600 thousand cases of invasive disease. More serious are the sequelae of these infections in the form of acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease. About 15 million children are suffering from rheumatic heart disease, out of these, 6 million in India alone. Streptococcal diseases can be considered as one of the most important groups of neglected
communicable diseases in India. There are many reasons for the inability to control GAS diseases in India. Besides poverty and living conditions, inadequate treatment and noncompliance with penicillin secondary prophylaxis after onset of rheumatic fever have all contributed to the high disease burden. The best perspective for controlling this disease is to develop a fast diagnostic test for rheumatogenic streptococci and to develop a regionspecific vaccine against group A streptococci. Prerequisite for diagnostic and vaccine development is in-depth understanding of streptococcal diseases in Indian scenario. Data on
the epidemiology of all GAS diseases, the characterization of the circulating strains in different regions of India, determination of genetic predisposition markers in different ethnic populations of India and immunological data to identify region-specific vaccine candidates are urgently needed. The major objective of this proposal is to pull together such information in a comprehensive way which will then form the basis of a novel diagnostic test for
rheumatogenic streptococci and for the identification of candidates to develop a regionspecific vaccine, using state-of-the-art technologies already established in Europe. This proposal is the first comprehensive approach to understand streptococcal diseases and would contribute towards solving a major health problem in India.

Project Objectives

The primary objective of this proposal is to apply a multi-disciplinary approach to understanding the spectrum of streptococcal diseases in India. A novel diagnostic test for rheumatogenic streptococci will be designed and candidates for development of region-specific group A streptococcal vaccines prototypes will be identified. A diagnostic test for rheumatogenic streptococci and development of an efficacious vaccine in India has never been attempted so far and is, therefore, a novel feature of this proposal. The specific objectives are:

Objective 1:

Epidemiological studies in defined areas in North and South India

Objective 2:

Genotyping of virulence strains obtained during the survey and expression profiling of representative strains

Objective 3:

Elucidation of nature and mechanisms of invasive diseases in India in comparison to European surveillance data

Objective 4:

Identification of genetic markers that contribute towards susceptibility to streptococcal infections in the two ethnically defined Indian populations

Objective 5:

Validation of the induction mechanisms of acute rheumatic fever in the Indian
scenario

Objective 6:

Rational design of a fast diagnostic test for the identification of streptococci capable of causing rheumatic fever based on the structural biology of collagen recognition

Objective 7:

Identification of candidates to develop region-specific vaccine

Objective 8:

Communication of relevant information, transfer of technology and knowledge on new biotechnological approaches to governments, decision makers, international agencies and health authorities

Objective 9:

Training of young Indian scientists in the modern methodology established at the European partners’ institutes

Partner

 

Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research

Tasks:

  • Coordination & project management
  • Virulence expression profiling of the isolates
  • design of protein arrays
  • identification of region-specific vaccine candidates and testing their efficacy

Project coordinator:

Prof. Dr. G. S. Chhatwal

Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research

Dept. Microbiology

Inhoffenstr. 7

D 38124 Braunschweig

Germany

e-mail: gsc@helmholtz-hzi.de

Team Members:

Dr. Andreas Nerlich, e-mail: Andreas.Nerlich@helmholtz-hzi.de

Dr. Vivek Sagar, e-mail: Vivek.Sagar@helmholtz-hzi.de

Rene Bergmann, e-mail: Rene.Bergmann@helmholtz-hzi.de

Post Graduate Insitute of Medical Education and Research

Tasks:

  • Setting up school-level survey for streptococcal carriage and pharyngitis in defined areas near Chandigarh, North India
  • Setting up surveillance for acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease in hospitals of survey area
  • Establishing of surveillance for invasive strep disease in tertiary care hospitals of Chandigarh

Project Participant:

Prof. Dr. K. K. Talwar

Dept. of Cardiology

Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER)

Chandigarh - 160 012

India

Tel. 0091-172-274-5062

Fax 0091-172-274-4401

e-mail: kktalwar@sancharnet.in

Christian Medical College

Tasks:

  • Establishment of a school survey system for the isolation, identification and characterization of GAS strains causing throat and skin infections in a highly endemic community
  • Establishment of a Registry for GAS disease and the strains causing them in a highly endemic south Indian community of school going children
  • Establishment of a hospital based Registry for GAS invasive disease in South India to determine their prevalence and the nature of strains causing them

Project Participant:

Prof. K. Brahmadathan

Dept. of Microbiology

Christian Medical College (CMC)

Vellore – 632 004

India

Tel. 0091-416-228-3085

Fax 0091-416-223-2103

e-mail: knb1948@hotmail.com

Karolinska Institute

Tasks:

  • Comparison of the nature of invasive streptococcal disease in relation to European data
  • Determination of host-pathogen interplay at the local site of infection
  • Determination of host humoral immunity in relation to disease manifestation
  • Identification of molecular mechanisms of streptococcal invasive diseases in India

Project Participant:

Prof. Anna Norrby-Teglund

Dept. of Medicine

Karolinska Institutet (KI)

SE-14186 Stockholm

Sweden

Tel. 0046-858-87296

Fax 0046-8746-7637

e-mail: Anna.Norrby-Teglund@ki.se

All India Institute of Medical Sciences

Tasks:

  • Establishing parameters of disease susceptibility in two patient cohorts with different ethnic backgrounds
  • Comparison of the disease associated MHC haplotypes between invasive disease and patients with rheumatic fever/ rheumatic heart disease
  • Understanding molecular mechanisms of genetic predisposition in streptococcal disease in India

Project Participant:

Prof. Dr. N. K. Mehra

Dept. of Transplant Immunology and Immunogenetics

All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS)

Ansari Nagar

New Delhi – 110 029

India

Tel. 0091-11-265-88588

Fax 0091-11-265-88663

e-mail: narin98@hotmail.com

University of St. Andrews

Tasks:

  • Analysis of the interaction of collagens with streptococcal surface components to select candidates for structural studies
  • structural analysis of collagen binding to streptococcal peptides
  • design and development of a fast diagnostic prototype assay for rheumatogenic streptococci based on collagen aggregation

Project Participant:

Dr. U. Schwarz-Linek

Centre for Biomolecular Sciences

University of St. Andrews

St Andrews – KY16 9AJ

United Kingdom

Tel. 0044-1334-463401

e-mail: us6@st-andrews.ac.uk

 

Beteiligte Gruppen

Es gibt keine Ergebnisse

Koordinator

Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung

Geldgeber / Förderer

EU - Europäische Union

PROBACTYS

Programmable Bacterial Catalysts

The project aims at constructing of a functioning, streamlined bacterial cell devoid of most of its genome and endowed with a series of highly coordinated, newly assembled genetic circuits for the biotransformation of a range of chloroaromatics into high added value compounds and that would include (although not necessarily in this order or all together) circuits for synchronized behaviour, noise minimisation, low-temperature biocatalysis and/or light-powered and, in addition, amenable to directed, accelerated evolution so that the function of each or some of the individual circuits can be optimised. This will be tested for the production of high added value compounds from chloroaromatics in bioreactors. By achieving such constructs as a proof-of-principle, it is aimed at establishing a solid, rational framework for the engineering of cells performing effectively and efficiently specific functions of biotechnological, environmental or medical interest. This encompasses the production of series of different, versatile circuits and corresponding components that can be used as building blocks in circuit engineering. The proposed workflow includes several work packages, each of which intertwining mathematical modelling with wet-lab experimental work as an integral module. PROBACTYS is a pioneering, concerted European effort towards the development of a Synthetic Biology framework and with a strong focus on the translation of emerging knowledge in biology, engineering and information technology to the development of new processes of biotechnological relevance.

Sprecher

Vitor Martins dos Santos

Koordinator

Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research (DE)

Geldgeber / Förderer

EU - Europäische Union

HEALTHY WATER

Assessment of human health impacts from emerging microbial pathogens in drinking water by molecular and epidemiological studies

The overall goal of the project is to advance our knowledge on pathogenesis of emergent microbial pathogens in drinking water and to understand their transmission to humans. The project will focus on all major types of pathogens, i.e. viruses, bacteria and protozoa, and will concentrate on a representative set of European drinking water supply systems and source waters of specific sensitivity to human health. This project will build on the output of the MicroRisk project by focussing on water systems that are in general not as well protected as the systems within MicroRisk. To reach the overall goal the following detailed objectives are approached: 1. Validation and application of detection technologies for emerging microbial pathogens based on nucleic acids. 2. Molecular survey and comparative detailed study of emerging pathogens in European drinking water sources and supply systems. 3. Understanding the human health impact of emerging pathogens by primary epidemiological studies targeted at specific systems and pathogens. 4. Determination of epidemiological correlations with molecular and environmental data and assessment of risk for waterborne microbial infections in Europe. An integrated research approach will be pursued to achieve these objectives by combining molecular and classical detection, activity assessment and epidemiological understanding of emerging pathogens in a specific set of drinking water systems from different European regions. The project will generate validated detection technologies for the targeted waterborne pathogens and reveal possible routes of transmission to humans via drinking water consumption. This new knowledge will provide guidance to improve the hygienic quality of European drinking water supplies and reduce the burden of waterborne infections for the people in Europe.

Strategic objective

According to the work programme of the European Commission in priority 1.1.5 “Food quality and safety” for Topic T5.4.8.3: “Pathogens in drinking water sources”, the following strategic aim is given: “The objective is to gather knowledge on emergent microbial pathogens in drinking water sources. Human health impacts of emergent micro-organisms should be further investigated.”

Project Summary

The overall goal of the project is to advance our knowledge on pathogenesis of emergent microbial pathogens in drinking water and to understand their transmission to humans. The project will focus on all major types of pathogens, i.e. viruses, bacteria and protozoa, and will concentrate on a representative set of European drinking water supply systems and source waters of specific sensitivity to human health. This project will build on the output of the MicroRisk project by focussing on water systems that are in general not as well protected as the systems within MicroRisk. To reach the overall goal the following detailed objectives are approached: 1. Validation and application of detection technologies for emerging microbial pathogens based on nucleic acids. 2. Molecular survey and comparative detailed study of emerging pathogens in European drinking water sources and supply systems. 3. Understanding the human health impact of emerging pathogens by primary epidemiological studies targeted at specific systems and pathogens. 4. Determination of epidemiological correlations with molecular and environmental data and assessment of risk for waterborne microbial infections in Europe. An integrated research approach will be pursued to achieve these objectives by combining molecular and classical detection, activity assessment and epidemiological understanding of emerging pathogens in a specific set of drinking water systems from different European regions. The project will generate validated detection technologies for the targeted waterborne pathogens and reveal possible routes of transmission to humans via drinking water consumption. This new knowledge will provide guidance to improve the hygienic quality of European drinking water supplies and reduce the burden of waterborne infections for the people in Europe.

Project objectives

To meet the general aim given by the Commission we have defined the following specific objectives within the HEALTHY-WATER project:

Objective 1: 

Development and validation of molecular detection technologies

for emerging microbial pathogens based on nucleic acids to provide a format

ready for mass application in drinking water samples

Objective 2: 

Molecular survey and comparative detailed study

of emerging microbial pathogens in European drinking water sources and

supply systems

Objective 3: 

Understanding human health impacts of emerging pathogens

in different drinking water  supply systems and different supply regimes

Objective 4: 

Determination of epidemiological correlations

with molecular and environmental data and assessment of risk for emerging

waterborne microbial infections in Europe 

Workplan

An integrated research approach (see Figure 1 below) will be pursued comprising the following elements: i) molecular detectionand activity assessment of emerging microbial pathogens in source water and supply systems for drinking water from different European regions, ii) prospective epidemiological studies and immunological surveys in targeted areas and of selected pathogens, iii) development of epidemiological models and iv) derivation of public health measures for drinking water in Europe. This integrated approach will be supported by data mining for knowledge about the targeted pathogens, electronic knowledge management and specific searches for epidemiological data from the European regions of relevance. In addition, molecular technologies based on DNA micro-arrays and fingerprints for detection and activity assessment of the emerging pathogens will be validated to allow rapid molecular analyses of many water samples.

Partner

HZI- Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research

Expertise:

  • Coordination & project management
  • molecular analysis of aquatic microbial communities
  • detection of virulence genes and pathogenic bacteria

Project coordinator:

Dr. Manfred G. Höfle
Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research
Dept. Vaccinology
Inhoffenstr. 7
38124 Braunschweig
Germany

E-Mail: Manfred.Hoefle@helmholtz-hzi.de
Website: www.helmholtz-hzi.de/healthy-water

Team Members:

Dr. Ingrid Brettar (second contact person for coordination) 
E-Mail: Ingrid.Brettar@helmholtz-hzi.de 

Prof. Carlos A. Guzman 
Leila Matter
Julia Bötel

UEA - University of East Anglia

Expertise:

  • epidemiology of water and foodborne diseases
  • molecular parasitolgy, analysis of virulence factors in protozoal waterborne pathogens

Project Participant:

Prof. Paul R. Hunter
School of Medicine
Health Policy and Practice
University of East Anglia
Norwich NR4 7TJ England

E-Mail: paul.hunter@uea.ac.uk

Team Members:

Dr. Kevin Tyler
Helen Risebro

IAD - International Association for Danube Research

  • communication with water works and consumers 
  • sampling strategy
  • data base provision

 

Project Participant:

Dr. Georg Kasimir
International Association for Danube Research (IAD)
Societas Internationalis Limnologiae 
c/o Federal Agency of Water Management
Dampfschiffhaufen 54
1220 Vienna, Austria
e-mail: dkasimir@gmail.com

URV - University Rovira i Virgili

  • reference laboratory on hygienic quality of drinking water
  • Hazard Analysis of Critical Control Point for Drinking Water (HACCP)

Project Participant:

 

Prof. Maria-José Figueras
Universitat Rovira Virgii I
Unitat de Microbiologia
Dept. De Ciències Bàsiques
Facultat de Medicina
Sant Llorenç, 21
E-43201 Reus

e-mail: mjfs@correu.urv.es

UB - University of Barcelona

  • analysis of water- and foodborne viruses 
  • molecular detection of microorganisms without cultivation 

Project Participant:

 

Prof. Albert Bosch
Dep. Microbiologia
Universitat de Barcelona
Av. Diagonal 645
E 08028 Barcelona
e-mail: abosch@ub.edu
web: http://www.ub.edu/microbiologia/viruse/index.htm

Team Members: 
Dr. Rosa Pinto
Umai Perez

SUEZ - SUEZ Environnement

  • managment of Drinking Water Supply Systems (DWWS) 
  • molecular detection of waterborne pathogens (generic concentration, micro-array technology, real-time PCR)

Project Participant:

 

Dr. Sophie Courtois
SUEZ Environnement - CIRSEE
38 rue du president Wilson
F78230 Le Pecq France
e-mail: sophie.courtois@suez-env.com
web: http://www.suez-environnement.com/

Team Members:

Kalissa Sebti

NIEH - National Institute of Environmental Health

  • Monitoring and detection of of Cryptosporidia and Giardia by immunomagnetic separation and immune fluorescence 
  • Public health issues and regulatory measures against waterborne infections

Project Participant:

 

Dr. Andrea Török Tamásné
National Center of Public Health
National Institute of Environmental Health
POB 26
1450 Budapest
Hungary
e-mail: toroka@okk.antsz.hu
web: http://efrira1.ansz.hu/oki

Team Members:

Dr. Rita Vasdinyei 
Orsolya Kis 
Aniko Kis 
Judit Plutzer 
Maria Asztalos
Klarissza Domokos 
Zsigmondné Boros

UNSA - Université de Nice Sophia Antipolis

  • bioinformatics of nucleic acids (primer and probe design)
  • electronic management and data base support (e-dashboard, central data bases)

Project Participant:

Prof. Richard Christen 
UNSA - CNRS UMR 6543 & Université de Nice Sophia Antipolis
Laboratoire de Biologie Virtuelle
Centre de Biochimie
Parc Valrose
F06108 Nice
e-mail: christen@unice.fr
Web site: http://bioinfo.unice.fr

Team Members:
Dr. Olivier Croce
Thierry Philipps

MDC- Molecular Diagnostics Center

  • molecular typing of microorganisms
  • provision of reference strains and nucleic acids

Project Participant:

Dr. Antonio Martinez-Murcia
MDC- Molecular Diagnostics Center
Crta. Ncnal. 340, Apdo. 169, 
Orihuela
Spain
e-mail: ammurcia@mdc-bt.com
Web: www.mdc-bt.com

Team Members:

Dr. Maria José Saavedra 
Dr. Remedios Oncina 
Marisa Sousa

Publications

Kahlisch, L. K. Henne, L. Gröbe, I. Brettar and M.G. Höfle; (2012). Assessing the species composition of viable bacteria in drinking water using Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS) and community fingerprinting. Microbial Ecol.: 63, 383-397

Henne, K., L. Kahlisch, I. Brettar and M.G. Höfle; (2012). Comparison of structure and composition of bacterial core communities in mature drinking water biofilms and bulk water of a local network. Appl. Environ. Microbiol.: 78, published ahead of print, 2 March, doi:10.1128/AEM.06373-11 PubMed

Pérez-Sautu U., D. Sano, S. Guix, G. Kasimir, R. M. Pintó and A. Bosch; (2012). Human norovirus occurrence and diversity in the Llobregat river catchment, Spain. Environ. Microbiol.: 14, 494-502 PubMed

Figueras M.J., A. Alperi, R. Beaz-Hidalgo, E. Stackebrandt, E. Brambilla, A. Monera and A. J. Martinez-Murcia; (2011). Aeromonas rivuli sp. nov., isolated from the upstream region of a karst water rivulet. Int. J. Syst. Evol. Microbiol.: 61, 242-248 PubMed

Collado L., A. Levican, J. Perez and M. J. Figueras; (2011). Arcobacter defluvii sp. nov., isolated from sewage samples. Int. J. Syst. Evol. Microbiol.:, 2155-2161 PubMed

Collado, L., G. Kasimir , U. Perez, A. Bosch, R. Pinto, G. Saucedo,J. M. Huguet, and M. Jose Figueras; (2011). Occurrence and diversity of Arcobacter spp. along the LlobregatRiver catchment, at sewage effluents and in a drinking water treatment plant. Water Res.: 44, 3696-3702 PubMed

Paul R. Hunter, P, R., M. Anderle de Sylor, H. L. Risebro, G. L. Nichols, D. Kay, and P. Hartemann; (2011). Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment of Cryptosporidiosis and Giardiasis from Very Small Private Water Supplies. Rsik Analysis:, 228-236PubMed

Collado L., and M. J. Figuera; (2011). Taxonomy, Epidemiology, and Clinical Relevance of the Genus Arcobacter. Clin. Microbiol. Rev.: 24, 174-192 PubMed

Croce, O., F. Chevenet and R. Christen; (2010). A New Web Server for the Rapid Identification of Microorganisms. J Microbial Biochem Technol.:, 84-88

Sano, D.; Pintó, R.M.; Omura, T.; Bosch, A.; (2010). Detection of Oxidative Damages on Viral Capsid Protein for Evaluation Structural Integrity and Infectivity of Human Norovirus. Environ. Sci. Technol.: 44 2, 808-812 PubMed

Kahlisch,L.; Henne,K.; Draheim,J.; Brettar,I.; Höfle,Manfred G.*; (2010). High-resolution in situ genotyping of Legionella pneumophila populations in drinking water by multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis using environmental DNA. Applied in Environmental Microbiology: 76 18, 6186-6195 HZI repository PubMed

Kahlisch, L.; Henne, K.; Groebe, L.; Draheim, J.; Höfle, M.G.; Brettar, I.; (2010). Molecular analysis of the bacterial drinking water community with respect to live/dead status. Water Science & Technology: WST: 61.1, 9-14

Bouzid M., K. M.Tyle, R. Christen, R. M. Chalmers, K. Elwin, and Paul R Hunter; (2010). Multi-locus analysis of human infective Cryptosporidium species and subtypes using. BMC Microbiol.: 10, 213 PubMed

Figueras M.J., and J. J. Borrego; (2010). New Perspectives in Monitoring Drinking Water Microbial Quality. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health: 4179-4202 PubMed

Fontes, M. C., M. J. Saavedra, A. Morena, C. Martins, and A. Martinez-Murcia; (2010). Phylogenetic identification of Aeromonas simiae from a pig, first isolate since species description. Vet. Microbiol.: 142, 313-316 PubMed

Collado, L.; Cleenwerck, I.; Van Trappen, S.; De Vos, P.; Figueras, M.J.; (2009). Arcobacter mytili sp. nov., an indoxyl acetatehydrolysis-negative bacterium isolated from mussels. Internat. J. System. Evolution. Microbiol.: 56 6, 1391-1396PubMed

Figueras, M.J.; Alperi, A.; Saavedra, M.J.; Ko, W.-C.; Gonzalo, N.; Navarro, M.; Martínez-Murcia A.J.; (2009). Clinical Relevance of the Recently Described Species Aerononas aquariorum. J. Clin. Microbiol.: 47 11, 3742-3746 PubMed

Plutzer, J.; Karanis, P.; (2009). Genetic polymorphism in Cryptosporidium species: An update. Vet. Parasitol.: G Model Vetpar:165 3-4, 187-199 PubMed

Harth-Chu, E.; Espejo, R.T.; Christen, R.; Guzmán, C.A; Höfle M.G.; (2009). Multiple-Locus Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Analysis for Clonal Identification of Vibrio parahaemolyticus Isolates by Using Capillary Electrophoresis. Appl. Environ. Microbiol.: 75 12, 4079-4088 PubMed

Bouzid, M.; Heavens, D.; Elwin, K.; Chalmers, R.M.; Hadfield, S.; Hunter, P.R.; Tyler, K.M.; (2009). Whole genome amplification (WGA) for archiving and genotyping of clinical isolates of Cryptosporidium species. Parasitology: 137 1, 27-36 PubMed

Demartaa, A.; Kupfera, M.; Riegelb, P.; Harf-Monteilb, C.; Tonollaa, M.; Peduzzia, R.; Monerac, A.; Saavedra, M.J.; Martinez-Murcia, A.;(2008). Aeromonas tecta sp. nov., isolated from clinical and environmental sources. Systematic and Applied Microbiology: 314, 278-286 PubMed

Plutzer, J., Karanis, P., Domokos, K., Törökné, A., Márialigeti, K.; (2008). Detection and characterization of Giardia and Cryptosporidium in Hungarian raw, surface and sewage water samples by IFT, PCR and sequence analysis of the SSUrRNA and GDH genes. Int. J. Hyg. Env. Health: 211 5-6, 524-533 PubMed

Bouzid,M.; Steverding,D.; Tyler,K.M.; (2008). Detection and surveillance of waterborne protozoan parasites. Curr. Op. Biotech.:19 3, 302-306 PubMed

Christen, R.; (2008). Global sequencing: a review of current molecular data and new methods available to assess microbial diversity. 23 4, 253-268 PubMed

Christen, R.; (2008). Identification of pathogens – a bioinformatic point of view. Curr. Op. Biotech.: 19, 266-273 PubMed

Brettar, I.; Höfle, M.G.; (2008). Molecular assessment of bacterial pathogens – a contribution to drinking water safety.. Curr. Op. Biotech.: 19 3, 274-280 PubMed

Bosch,A.; Guix,S.; Sano,D.; Pinto,R.M.; (2008). New tools for the study and direct surveillance of viral pathogens in water.Curr. Op. Biotech.: 19 3, 295-301 PubMed

Croce O.; Chevenet, F.; Christen, R.; (2008). OligoHeatMap (OHM): an online tool to estimate and display hybridizations of oligonucleotides onto DNA sequences. Nucl. Acids Res.: 36, 154-156 PubMed

Martinez-Murcia,A.J.; Monera,A.; Alperi,A.; FiguerasM.J.; Saavedra,M.J.; (2008). Phylogenetic evidence suggests that strains of Aeromonas hydrophila subsp. dhakensis belong to the species Aeromonas aquariorum sp. nov.. Curr. Microbiol.: 58 1,76-80 PubMed

Henne,K.; Kahlisch,L.; Draheim,J.; Brettar,I.; Höfle,M.; (2008). Polyvalent fingerprint based molecular surveillance methods for drinking water supply systems.. Water Science and Technology: Water Supply: 8 5, 527-532

Projektleiter

Beteiligte Gruppen

Es gibt keine Ergebnisse

Koordinator

Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research (DE)

Geldgeber / Förderer

EU - Europäische Union

TARPOL

Targeting environmental pollution with engineered microbial systems à la carte

Synthetic Biology deals with the rational combination of biological properties with central elements of engineering design. We argue that by merging the genetic tool box already available with disciplines such as electrical, mechanical, or chemical engineering and computer sciences, there is an extraordinary opportunity to take a fresh approach to longstanding environmental pollution problems through a vigorous application of modelling techniques and organizing the development of novel biological (e.g. catalytic) systems along a hierarchical architecture with defined and standardized interfaces. However, this endeavour faces 3 major bottlenecks that this Coordination Action attempts to overcome: [i] The scientific and technical communities of european contributors to the application of SB to environmental issues (i.e., Environmental Biotechnologists, Bioinformaticians and experts on the Origin-of-Life subject) have so far failed to recognise their latent capacity to shape a fresh discipline at their very interface, [ii] The new field still misses a comprehensive language and a shared conceptual frame for description of minimally functional biological parts (specifically dealing with catalytic properties and regulatory circuits) and [iii] The development of the SB field touches upon social sensitivities related to recreating life-in-the-test-tube, which threats with a re-enactment of the controversy on GMOs and thus it worries off the needed industrial ease in the field. To tackle all these challenges, TARPOL proposes a dynamic 2-year programme of activities, run by a large collection of stakeholders in the field and aimed at coordinating the so far fragmented efforts to direct this emerging discipline into the most industrially beneficial and socially viable directions.

Sprecher

Vitor Martins dos Santos

Koordinator

Universitat de Valencia (ES)

Geldgeber / Förderer

EU - Europäische Union

FLUINHIBIT

Small Molecule Inhibitors of the Trimeric Influenza Virus Polymerase

FLUINHIBIT aims at discovering small molecule inhibitors of the influenza virus A subunit interaction between PA and PB1, crucial for viral replication.Starting from an inhibitory peptide, and supported by characterization of the PB1-binding domain of PA, molecular modeling will be employed to rationally design and synthesize peptidomimetics via traditional medicinal chemistry and a novel fragment based library synthesis approach. In parallel, a high-throughput assay will be developed to screen large compound collections and unique in-house small molecule libraries. The resulting hits will be profiled in cell-based assays and lead candidates with antiviral activity will be identified for preclinical development.

Partner

 

Biotechnology companies

PiKe Pharma GmbH, Switzerland

Inte:Ligand GmbH, Austria

Academic institutions

University Hospital Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany

Institute of Biotechnology, Vilnius, Lithuania

Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany

University of Siena, Siena, Italy

Sprecher

Ronald Frank

Koordinator

PiKe Pharma GmbH (CH)

Geldgeber / Förderer

EU - Europäische Union

FASTEST-TB

Development and Clinical Evaluation of Fast Tests for Tuberculosis Diagnosis

It is widely accepted that rapid, cost-effective diagnosis of high sensitivity and specificity is a pre-requisite for the prevention and control of tuberculosis, a global disease in humans killing more than 3 million people annually. Methods and devices currently in use do not meet these requirements. The main objectives of this proposal are 1. to identify novel antigens using genomic and proteomic approach, 2. to purify sufficient quantities of antigens and raise antibodies  3. optimise immobilisation conditions for the specific antigens and antibodies on different carriers, 3. manufacture and evaluate the tests using approximately 6000 clinical specimens (sputum, saliva, serum, urine) from TB patients before and during therapy. In our opinion, such tests and  devices would be a major breakthrough in the early diagnosis and prevention of tuberculosis. In this project, experts from EU member states and  scientists from TB-endemic countries (India, Turkey, Nigeria) shall evaluate the clinical potential of antigen and antibody detection  using the  high speed, cost-effective POC tests, with which  results can be obtained  on site within 20 min. The main  aim is to develop  a non-invasive, low cost test stable at room temperature enabling its application in developing countries. 

 

Sprecher

Helmut Blöcker

Koordinator

LIONEX Diagnostics & Therapeutics GmbH (DE)

Geldgeber / Förderer

EU - Europäische Union

EMERGENCE

Setting the bases for synthetic biology in Europe

Synthetic biology has emerged as a very recent but highly promising approach to re-organizing the scientific biological endeavor by integrating central elements of engineering design. By applying the tool box of engineering disciplines such as electrical, mechanical, or chemical engineering and computer sciences, including the vigorous application of modeling techniques and organizing the development of novel biological systems along a hierarchical systems architecture with defined and standardized interfaces, synthetic biology aims at no less than revolutionizing the way we do bioengineering today. If successful, synthetic biology will transform bioengineering into a highly successful and sustainable life science industry.The objective of this coordination action (CA) EMERGENCE is to provide a communication and working platform for the emerging European synthetic biology community in order to strengthen the organizational and conceptual basis of the synthetic biology as a true engineering discipline in biological engineering.

Partner

 

Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zurich), Sven Panke, Jörg Stelling, Frauke Greve

Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Scientificas (CSIC), Victor de Lorenzo

Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), Alfonso Valencia

Helmholtz Zentrum für Infektionsforschung, (HZI), Vitor Martins dos Santos

Royal DSM, Luis Pasamontes

University College London (UCL), Nicolas Szita

Geneart AG, Ralf Wagner, Marcus Graf

Center for Genomic Regulation (CRG), Luis Serrano

University of Cambridge (UCAM), Jim Haseloff

Ecole Polytechnique (EP), Alfonso Jaramillo

Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Randy Rettberg

Sprecher

Vitor Martins dos Santos

Koordinator

ETH Zürich (CH)

Geldgeber / Förderer

EU - Europäische Union

CASIMIR

Coordination and Sustainability of International Mouse Informatics Resources

Casimir logo 200CASIMIR is a coordination action of the 6th Framework Programme of the European Commission, which focuses on co-ordination and integration of databases set up in support of FP5 and FP6 projects containing experimental data, including sequences, and material resources such as biological collections, relevant to the use of the mouse as a model organism for human disease. Interoperability of disseminated databases will provide enormous synergy in the provision, integration and analysis of a wide range of data with concomitant added value for research projects. Having set standards and benchmarks the proposed action will then reach out to co-ordinate other European and International databases and consult with the Community.

The project comprises eight work packages and eight partners.

WP8 - User interactions

Prof. Dr. Klaus Schughart

Objectives

Identify and describe use cases for database queries, analysis and representation of results through:

  • Holding user group meetings
  • Generate use reports
  • Assessment of scientific and financial value of current and future databases to users
  • Collate and report on community feedback from Web publications, literature publications and illustrative study.

Funding

European Commission within its FP6 Programme, under the thematic area "Life sciences, genomics and biotechnology for health".

Contract number: LSHG-CT-2006-037811. 

Partner

 

University of Cambridge, Cambridge

MRC- Medical Research Council, Oxfordshire Medical Research Council, Human Genetics Unit, Edinburgh

Helmholtz Zentrum Braunschweig - German Research Centre for Infection Research

Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen - German Research Center for Environmental Health

European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), Monterotondo, Rome

European Bioinformatics Institute, Hinxton, Cambridge

FLEMING-Biomedical Sciences Research Center

Alexander Fleming Institute of Immunology Institute of Immunology, BSRC Alexander Fleming, Athens

CNR-Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche-Istituto di Biologia Cellulare (CNR-IBC) Monterotondo Scalo, Rome (Italy)

Istituto di Biologia Cellulare, CNR, Campus "A. Buzzati-Traverso", Rome

Projektleiter

Beteiligte Gruppen

Sprecher

Klaus Schughart

Koordinator

Prof. Dr. Paul Schofield, Cambridge University (UK)

Geldgeber / Förderer

EU - Europäische Union

ProteomeBinders

A Eurropean Infrastructure of Ligand Binding Molecules against the Human Proteome

ProteomeBinders is a European consortium proposing to establish a comprehensive infrastructure resource of binding molecules for detection of the human proteome, together with tools for their use and applications in studying proteome function and organisation.
This 4-year FP6 Research Infrastructures Coordination Action, started in March 2006, is funded with 1.8 M€ and links 25 EU and 2 USA partners, leaders in the area of binders and their applications. The project is coordinated by Dr Mike Taussig (Cambridge). We advocate the organisation of an infrastructure of binders, available at cost and with no restrictions for research use, for which we are applying for funding under FP7.
Currently there is no pan-European platform for the systematic development and quality control for these essential reagents. We aim to provide a set of consistently characterised binders, required to detect all the relevant human proteins in tissues and fluids in health and disease. As the size of the human proteome is at least an order of magnitude greater than the ~ 21.000 protein coding genes known to date, and as for many applications several binders against each target are needed, the scale of our project is potentially immense.
To date, antibodies are the most widely used protein-binders, but novel binder types based on alternative protein scaffolds, nucleic acids, peptides and chemical entities each have significant advantages and will be carefully evaluated. We will coordinate a European resource by integrating existing infrastructures, reviewing technologies and high-throughput production methods, standardising tools and applications, and establishing a database.
Being one of the largest genome-scale projects in Europe, aiming ultimately to produce and collect hundreds of thousands of specific binders, the ProteomeBinders resource will bring huge benefits for basic and applied research, impacting on healthcare, diagnostics, target discovery for drug intervention and therapeutics.

Partner

 

Department of Immunotechnology, Lund University, Sweden
Create Health - Strategic Centre for Clinical Cancer Research

Biosciences Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA

University College, Dublin, Ireland

CNRS-Universités Aix-Marseille I & II, France

Department of Biotechnology, Technical University Braunschweig, Germany
Antibody Factory

Department of Chemical Biology, Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany
ChemBioNet

Structural and Computational Biology Unit, EMBL, Heidelberg, Germany
ELM: Functional sites in proteins
phosphoELM: S/T/Y phosphorylation sites

SomaLogic Inc., Boulder CO, USA

Department of Biochemistry, University of Kassel, Germany

Proteomics Services, European Bioinformatics Institute, Hinxton, UK
HUPO-PSI: Proteomics Standards Initiative

Division of Functional Genome Analysis, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany

NMI, Tübingen, Germany

VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Turku, Finland

In-vitro ligand screening group, Max Planck Institute of Molecular Genetics, Berlin, Germany
Antibody Factory

Genomics & Proteomics Core Facilities, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany

Advanced Molecular Techniques in Genetics, Proteomics, and Medicine, The Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University, Sweden
MolTools - developing tools for the postgenomic era

Center for Human and Clinical Genetics at the Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands

imaGenes, Berlin, Germany

Sanger Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, UK

Dept. of Molecular and Cellular Interactions, VIB, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium

School of Biotechnology, KTH, Stockholm, Sweden

Department of Biochemistry, University of Zurich, Switzerland

Medical Faculty University of Rijeka, Croatia

Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry and Biopolymer Structure Analysis, University of Konstanz, Germany

EMBL Monoclonal Antibody Core Facility, Monterotondo, Italy

Laboratoire Bordelais de Recherche en Informatique, Bordeaux, France
ProteomeBinders Bioinformatics Wiki

Biologische Chemie, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Germany

Protein Technology Group,
Babraham Bioscience Technologies, Cambridge, UK
ESF Programme on Integrated Approaches for Functional Genomics
MolTools - developing tools for the postgenomic era

GSF - National Research Center for Environment and Health, Munich, Germany
Partner in Interaction Proteome (EU FP6 IP)

School of Biotechnology, KTH, Stockholm, Sweden
Human Protein Atlas: expression and localisation of proteins in human normal and cancer tissues



 

 



 

Sprecher

Ronald Frank/Jutta Eichler

Koordinator

Babraham Bioscience Technologies Ltd (UK)

Geldgeber / Förderer

EU - Europäische Union

EuroPathoGenomics EPG

European Virtual Institute for Functional Genomics of Bacterial Pathogens

EPG is a network of excellence (NoE "EPG") for functional genomics of bacterial pathogens. It is a consortium of leading European research teams committed to working with each other and with others to establish the European research area as an area of excellence in research on infectious diseases caused by bacterial pathogens.
The major objective is to organise the mass of genomic information that has become available, regarding both microorganisms and their hosts, into schemes allowing one to decipher the cross talks between pathogens and commensals and their host cell and tissue targets. Importantly, the critical mass established attracts the interest and collaboration of leading laboratories in other related basic disciplines, heightening the potential for incisive multi-disciplinary accomplishments. Based on this strong research background, high level teaching is organised at both graduate and postdoctoral levels, both in national institutions, capitalising on the current "cutting edge" research, and in European courses and workshops that also attract scientists from non-EU countries. Exchange programmes are designed to facilitate international and multidisciplinary development.

Partner

 

Bayerische Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg

Helmholtz Zentrum für Infektionsforschung

Max-Planck-Institut für Infektionsbiologie

Institut Pasteur

Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique

University of Oxford

Imperial College of Science Technology and Medicine

Università di Padova

Università degli Studi di Messina

Università degli Studi di Siena

Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas

Universidad Pública de Navarra

Umeå Universitet

Karolinska Institutet

Uppsala Universitet

Lunds Universitet

Helsingin yliopisto

Danmarks Tekniske Universitet

Aarhus Universitet

Academisch Medisch Centrum bij de Universiteit van Amsterdam

Medizinische Universität Innsbruck

Veterinary Medical Research Institute of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences

University of Pécs

Institute of Microbiology of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic

Tel Aviv University

Université René Descartes - Paris 5

Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen

Technische Universität Kaiserslautern

Medizinische Hochschule Hannover

Universitätsklinikum Münster

Ludwig Maximilians Universität München

Ernst Moritz Arndt Universität Greifswald

Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen

Université de la Mediterranée Aix-Marseille 2

BioMedTec Franken e.V.

SCIENION AG

Loke Diagnostics ApS

QIAGEN Hamburg GmbH

 








Sprecher

Jürgen Wehland

Koordinator

Bayerische Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg (DE)

Geldgeber / Förderer

EU - Europäische Union

MUGEN

Integrated Functional Genomics in Mutant Mouse Models as Tools to Investigate the Complexity of Human Immunological Disease

MUGEN aims to structure and shape a world-class network of European scientific and technological excellence in the field of 'murine models of human immunological disease', to advance understanding of the genetic basis of disease and to enhance innovation and translatability of research efforts.
MUGEN's specific mission is to bring together different expertise from academic and industrial laboratories in order to study human immunological disease by integrating the participant's strengths in immunological knowledge with new approaches in functional genomics. In this way MUGEN expects to bring Europe a competitive advantage in the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic tools. In concert, MUGEN promotes training of young researchers and exploitation, dissemination and communication of scientific and technological excellence both within and outside of the network, to include all interested stakeholders in the area of human immunological diseases.

Partner

 

Biomedical Sciences Research Center “Al. Fleming” (FLEMING)
Inserm EMI -0101- Institut Pasteur (IP)
Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ)
Centre d’ Immunology de Marseille – Luminy (CNRS)
University of Milano – Bicocca (UNIMIB)
Inst. Of Experimental Immunology, University of Zurich (EXPIMMZH)
Helmholtz-Zentrum for Infektionsforschung 
The Netherlands Cancer Institute (NKI-AVL)
EMBL (EMBL+EBI)
Medical Research Council (MRC-HIU+NIMR)

Sprecher

Werner Müller

Koordinator

Biomedical Science Research Center (GR)

Geldgeber / Förderer

EU - Europäische Union

SFB 566

Zytokin-Rezeptoren und Zytokin-abhängige Signalwege als therapeutische Zielstrukturen

Schwerpunkt des Sonderforschungsbereichs sind Untersuchungen zur Expression und Regeneration von Zytokinrezeptoren und zytokinrezeptorabhängiger Signalmoleküle mit dem Ziel, therapeutische Einsatzmöglichkeiten zur Regulation dieser Moleküle zu evaluieren. Das wissenschaftliche Programm dieses Sonderforschungsbereichs beinhaltet Projekte, die sich mit einem der interessantesten Teilgebiete der Zytokinforschung befassen. Die kurz- bis mittelfristigen Ziele sind die Identifizierung von Rezeptormolekülen und Signalpeptiden als stimulierende oder inhibierende Targetmoleküle für die therapeutische Beeinflussung der Zytokinwirkung durch natürliche Peptide oder chemisch hergestellte spezifische Inhibitoren. Langfristig ist der klinische Einsatz dieser identifizierten Inhibitoren bzw. Stimulatoren bei verschiedenen hämatologischen, malignen, immunologischen oder Infektionserkrankungen geplant. Als Beispiel für ein mögliches Gelingen dieser Therapiestrategie sei die erfolgreiche Hemmung der ABL-spezifischen Tyrosinkinase in vivo als Therapie bei Patienten mit CML zu nennen.

Partner

 

Medizinische Hochschule Hannover

Helmholtz Zentrum für Infektionsforschung

Beteiligte Gruppen

Es gibt keine Ergebnisse

Sprecher

Prof. Dr. med. Karl Welte (MHH)

Geldgeber / Förderer

DFG - Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft

SFB 578

Integration gen- und verfahrenstechnischer Methoden zur Entwicklung biotechnologischer Prozesse - Vom Gen zum Produkt

Der SFB 578 „Integration gen- und verfahrenstechnischer Methoden zur Entwicklung biotechnologischer Prozesse – Vom Gen zum Produkt –“ stellt sich die Aufgabe, natur- und ingenieurwissenschaftliche, insbesondere gen- und verfahrenstechnische Methoden zu verknüpfen, um Produkte mit hoher Wertschöpfung zu gewinnen. Dabei werden vorrangig Prozesse zur mikrobiellen Herstellung neuer heterologer rekombinanter Proteine systematisch bearbeitet. Die Zielprodukte weisen entweder eine pharmazeutische Wirkung auf (Antikörper, Knochenwachstumsfaktoren) oder sind als Biokatalysatoren einsetzbar (Glycosyltransferasen), die neuartige Oligosaccharide synthetisieren. Als Wirtssysteme werden die Bakterien Escherichia coli (gram negativ) und Bacillus megaterium (gram positiv) sowie der filamentöse Pilz Aspergillus niger eingesetzt. Ziel des SFB ist es, an den genannten Beispielen die Wechselwirkungen biologischer, biochemischer und verfahrenstechnischer Vorgänge zu erfassen und besser zu verstehen. Die Forschungsschwerpunkte liegen dabei auf einer ganzheitlichen systembiotechnologischen Modellbildung für das biologische System, der Produktbildung im Reaktor, der Produktaufreinigung sowie der Anwendungstechnik.

Partner

 

Institut für Pharmazeutische Technologie, TU Braunschweig

Institut für Mikrotechnik, TU Braunschweig

Institut für Mikrobiologie, TU Braunschweig

Institut für Biochemie und Biotechnologie, TU Braunschweig

Institut für Partikeltechnik, TU Braunschweig

Helmholtz Zentrum für Infektionsforschung GmbH, Abt. Strukturbiologie

Institut für Bioverfahrenstechnik, TU Braunschweig

Helmholtz Zentrum für Infektionsforschung GmbH, Zelluläre Proteomforschung

Institut für Elektrische Messtechnik und Grundlagen der Elektrotechnik, TU Braunschweig

Institut für Technische Chemie, TU Braunschweig

Institut für Organische Chemie, Würzburg

Institut für Verfahrenstechnik, Otto-von-Guericke-Universität Magdeburg



Beteiligte Gruppen

Sprecher

Prof. Dr. Dieter Jahn

Geldgeber / Förderer

DFG - Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft

SFB 587

Immunreaktionen der Lunge bei Infektionen und Allergie

Im Projektbereich A stehen die Interaktionen von mikrobiellen Erregern mit Zellen der Lunge im Mittelpunkt. Die Rolle des Fusionsproteins des respiratorischen Synzytialvirus in der Interaktion mit Epithelzellen wird untersucht. Das Influenza C- Glykoprotein soll zum Gentransfer in das ausdifferenzierte Epithel verwendet werden. Es wird studiert, warum die Genexpression von Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae vom Infektionsstadium abhängt und wie potenzielle Virulenzfaktoren von Streptococcus suis auf die Erreger-Wirt-Interaktion wirken. Die molekularen Mechanismen der Anheftung von Streptococcus pneumoniae an Epithelzellen, mukosale und systemische Immunisierungsstrategien bei bakteriellen Infektionen stehen im Vordergrund eines weiteren Projekts. Der lungenpathogene Pilz Aspergillus fumigatus und seine Interaktion mit Immunzellen werden in einem anderen Projekt behandelt.
Im Projektbereich B werden die Rolle von Immunzellen wie Lymphozyten, dendritischen Zellen und eosinophilen Granulozyten bei Infektionen und Immunreaktionen der Lunge studiert. Außerdem wird die Bedeutung der Chemokin- und Neurotrophinrezeptoren bei entzündlichen und allergischen Erkrankungen wie Asthma in der Lunge untersucht. Die Rolle der Umweltschadstoffe und die Interaktion zwischen allergischen Entzündungsreaktionen und dem pulmonalen Surfactant-System beim Asthma stehen bei Experimenten am Patienten im Vordergrund.

Partner

 

Helmholtz Zentrum für Infektionsforschung

Fraunhofer ITEM

Stiftung Tierärtzliche Hochschule Hannover

Twincore

Beteiligte Gruppen

Sprecher

Prof. Dr. Gesine Hansen (MHH)

Geldgeber / Förderer

DFG - Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft

SFB 599

Zukunftsfähige bioresorbierbare und permantente Implantate aus metalischen und keramischen Werkstoffen

Der SFB 599, Kurztitel Biomedizintechnik, bearbeitet Grundlagen der Entwicklung und Herstellung von zukunftsfähigen medizinischen Implantaten zum Wohl der Patienten unter Beachtung gesundheitsökonomischer Aspekte. Ziel ist die Wiederherstellung von Organfunktionen durch resorbierbare und permanente Implantate aus Werkstoffen, die durch Innovationen in der Herstellung, der physikalischen Bearbeitung, der chemischen Beschichtung mit Polymeren und der Ankopplung von Wirkstoffen (Funktionalisierung), der extrakorporalen Zellbesiedlung (Biologisierung) sowie Simulation und Prüfung an das klinische Einsatzgebiet optimal angepasst werden. Die materialseitigen Lösungsansätze werden zellbiologisch in vitro hinsichtlich ihrer Biokompatibilität charakterisiert, in vivo auf Funktionalität getestet sowie in geeigneten Simulationen abgebildet. Die Zusammensetzung des Materials und seine Oberflächenbeschaffenheit werden. Über Modifikationen der Materialzusammensetzung, seiner physiko-chemischen Beschaffenheit und der Oberflächeneigenschaften durch Funktionalisierung werden die Gewebeverträglichkeit (Biokompatibilität), die programmierte Wechselwirkung mit dem ortständigen Gewebe (Biomimetik) sowie die Funktion (Funktionalität) auf das zugedachte Anwendungsgebiet eingestellt. Dieser breite Ansatz wird auf Implantate aus der Orthopädie und Unfallchirurgie, der Hals-Nasen-Ohren-Heilkunde, der Kardiochirurgie und der Zahnheilkunde angewendet.

Partner

 

Medizinische Hochschule Hannover

Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Universität Hannover

Tierärztliche Hochschule Hannover

Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V.

Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung GmbH

Technische Universität Baunschweig



Beteiligte Gruppen

Es gibt keine Ergebnisse

Sprecher

Prof. Dr. Thomas Lenarz (MHH-HNO)

Geldgeber / Förderer

DFG - Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft

SFB 621

Pathobiologie der intestinalen Mukosa

Die intestinale Mukosa, die größte äußere Oberfläche des Makroorganismus, ist exponierte Grenzfläche des Organsystems Darm. Sie ist ein empfindlicher Seismograph für Störungen von außen (infektiös) und innen (immunologisch), wodurch ihre physiologischen Funktionen (Aufnahme und Ausscheidung) erheblich beeinträchtigt werden können. Daraus resultieren drei Schwerpunktbereiche der Forschung, denen sich Forschergruppen aus der Medizinischen Hochschule Hannover, der Tierärztlichen Hochschule Hannover und der Gesellschaft für Biotechnologische Forschung Braunschweig zugewandt haben.
Die postnatale Interferenz und Anpassung der bakteriellen Normalflora an das angeborene (innate) Immunsystem mit der Folge eines im Normalfall lebenslangen, von gegenseitigem "Respekt" getragenen Zusammenlebens von Mikro- und Makroorganismus an der Grenzschicht der intestinalen Mukosa gibt bis heute viele Rätsel auf. Der Sonderforschungsbereich will nun als probiotischen Leitkeim den E. coli-Stamm Nissle 1917 in verschiedenen Teilprojekten und Tiermodellen einsetzen, ihn gentechnisch manipulieren und die vollständige Genomsequenz dieses Coli-Stammes bestimmen, um die molekularen Grundlagen der probiotischen Effekte aufzuklären. Eine weitere Querschnittsthematik, eng mit dem probiotischen Zugang verknüpft, wird durch das gnotobiotische Zentralprojekt Z1 etabliert. Für die Analyse des Einflusses der Darmflora auf die Entstehung, Perpetuation und Therapie von CED sind der Einsatz gnotobiotischer und dann gezielt besiedelter k.o.-Mausstämme von großer Wichtigkeit.

Partner

 

Medizinische Hochschule Hannover

Stiftung Tierärztliche Hochschule Hannover

Helmholtz Zentrum für Infektionsforschung

Beteiligte Gruppen

Sprecher

Prof. Dr. Reinhold Förster (MHH)

Geldgeber / Förderer

DFG - Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft

SFB 738

Optimierung konventioneller und innovativer Transplantate

Durch die exzellenten technischen Erfolge der Transplantationsmedizin, einer verbesserten Immunsuppression und Therapie von Infektionen konnte das mittlere Überleben transplantierter Organe deutlich verbessert werden. Dadurch ergeben sich neue Herausforderungen an die Transplantationsmedizin: Das übergreifende Ziel des Sonderforschungsbereichs ist die Induktion einer gewebsspezifischen Immuntoleranz unter Erhalt der generellen Immunkompetenz gegenüber Infektionen und Tumorentstehung. Im Bereich der soliden Organtransplantation stellt das chronische Transplantatversagen eine immer größer werdende Herausforderung dar. Dieses ist dabei nicht nur immunologisch bedingt, sondern auch durch Infektionen, Rekurrenz der Grunderkrankung und mesenchymale Umbauvorgänge gekennzeichnet. Eines der Hauptprobleme der Blutstammzelltransplantation ist eine Vermeidung einer Graft-vs.-Host-Erkrankung (GvH) unter Erhalt eines Graft-vs.-Leukämie-Effektes (GvL). Daneben sind auch nach Stammzelltransplantationen Infektionen (insbesondere durch den Cytomegalievirus) ein klinisches Problem, welches eine erhebliche Morbidität der Patienten verursacht.
Aufgrund des Organmangels in der Transplantation solider Organe und neuer zell- und molekularbiologischer Möglichkeiten wird das Spektrum der Transplantationsmedizin zukünftig auch im steigenden Maße Zelltransplantationen und konditionierte Transplantate enthalten. Für die Verbesserung von Geweben und Zellen kommen dazu nicht nur bei zugrunde liegenden genetischen Erkrankungen gentherapeutische Maßnahmen, sondern auch alternative Verfahren des Transfers von RNA oder Proteinen zum Einsatz.
Der Sonderforschungsbereich versucht, sich diesen neuen Anforderungen der Transplantationsmedizin zu stellen und seinen Beitrag zu leisten. Seine Basis in der Medizinischen Hochschule Hannover stellen die in mehreren Abteilungen stark vertretenen Immunwissenschaften und das umfangreiche Programm klinischer Transplantationen dar. Der Sonderforschungsbereich besteht aus drei Projektbereichen:
(1) Immunität und Toleranz nach Stammzelltransplantation,
(2) Determinanten des Langzeitüberlebens solider Organe,
(3) Neue Konzepte der molekularen und zellulären Transplantationsmedizin.
Die drei Projektbereiche verfolgen bei hoher methodischer und inhaltlicher Verzahnung dabei synergetische Ziele in der Erforschung von Immunität und Toleranz, einer Verbesserung der langfristigen Transplantatfunktionen und der Entwicklung neuer therapeutischer Maßnahmen. Die Umsetzung in der Klinik wird u. a. auch dadurch gefördert, dass die Mehrheit der teilnehmenden Wissenschaftler aktiv in die Transplantationsprogramme der Medizinischen Hochschule Hannover und die Diagnostik von Transplantatfehlfunktionen involviert ist.

Partner

 

Medizinische Hochschule Hannover

Beteiligte Gruppen

Sprecher

Prof. Dr. Michael Peter Manns (MHH)

Geldgeber / Förderer

DFG - Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft

SFB 854

Molekulare Organisation der zellulären Kommunikation im Immunsystem

Bei der immunologischen Infektabwehr interagieren unterschiedliche Zellen des Immunsystems (Granulozyten, Makrophagen, Mesangialzellen, dendritische Zellen, T-Zellen, B-Zellen, Epithelzellen) miteinander und verhindern so die Invasion und Ausbreitung pathogener Keime.Störungen der intra- oder interzellulären Kommunikation führen zwangsläufig zu Fehlfunktionen des Immunsystems, die in Immundefizienzen, Allergien oder Autoimmunerkrankungen münden können. Eine Beeinträchtigung der zellulären Kommunikation im Immunsystem beeinflusst auch dessen Fähigkeit, maligne entartete Zellen frühzeitig zu erkennen und zu eliminieren.
Die Erforschung der Frage, wie die intra- und interzelluläre Kommunikation im Immunsystem auf molekularer Ebene gesteuert wird, ist von zentraler Bedeutung für das Verständnis physiologischer und pathophysiologischer Immunreaktionen. Weiterhin können sich Aus der Aufklärung der molekularen Mechanismen, die zelluläre Kommunikationsprozesse im Immunsystem steuern, neue Optionen für eine medikamentöse Beeinflussung des Immunsystems in Krankheitssituationen ergeben.
Ziel des Sonderforschungsbereiches 854 ist es, unter Einsatz von biochemischen, zellbiologischen und molekulargenetischen Methoden zentrale Prozesse der intra- und interzellulären Kommunikation im Immunsystem zu entschlüsseln. Ein weiterer Schwerpunkt des SFB854 liegt in der molekularen und intravitalen Mikroskopie, mit deren Hilfe die inter- und intrazelluläre Kommunikation im Rahmen der physiologischen und pathophysiologischen Immunreaktionen analysiert werden soll.

Partner

 

Leibniz-Institut für Neurobiologie, Magdeburg

Freie Universität Berlin

Medizinische Fakultät, Universitätsklinikum Magdeburg A. ö. R.

Otto von Guericke Universität, Magdeburg

Helmholtz Zentrum für Infektionsforschung

Projektleiter

Beteiligte Gruppen

Sprecher

Professor Dr. Burkhart Schraven (Otto-von-Guericke-University Magdeburg)

Geldgeber / Förderer

DFG - Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft

SFB 900

Chronische Infektionen: Mikrobielle Persistenz und ihre Kontrolle

Vom jüngsten Lebensalter an ist der Mensch von vielen Mikroorganismen besiedelt, welche Mechanismen entwickelt haben, ihre Präsenz in unterschiedlichen Habitaten im menschlichen Körper über die gesamte Lebensdauer des Wirts aufrecht zu erhalten. Die Beziehung zwischen Mensch und persistierenden Mikroorganismen kann symbiotischer Natur sein – etwa im Fall einer Einbeziehung der intestinalen Bakterienflora in Stoffwechselprozesse oder der durch kolonisierende Bakterien und Viren geprägten Reifung des Immunsystems.

Auf der anderen Seite kann die Besiedlung des Wirts durch persistierende Mikroorganismen zu Erkrankung und Tod führen, wenn bestimmte mikrobielle Eigenschaften Krankheitsprozesse auslösen oder durch genetisch bedingte bzw. erworbene Schwächen des Wirts eine stabile Koexistenz mit normalerweise harmlosen Mikroben entweder nicht etabliert werden kann oder im Laufe des Lebens in einen pathogenen Verlauf übergeht.

Weltweit stellen chronische Infektionen durch HIV, HCV, Mycobacterium tuberculosis oder Helicobacter pylori u. a. eine wichtige Ursache für potentiell vermeidbare Erkrankungen und Tod dar. Ferner haben die Fortschritte der modernen Medizin auf dem Gebiet des Organersatzes und die gestiegene Lebenserwartung von Patienten mit genetisch bedingten Abwehrdefekten eine steigende Anzahl iatrogen immunsupprimierter oder anderweitig immunkompromittierter Personen zur Folge. Damit zusammenhängend nimmt die Bedeutung von opportunistischen Infektionen zu, von denen viele durch persistierende, im Immunkompetenten weitgehend harmlose Erreger verursacht werden.

Neue therapeutische Ansatzpunkte 

Angesichts der klinischen Probleme, welche durch chronische Infektionen hervorgerufen werden, wird es langfristig notwendig sein, neue therapeutische Ansatzpunkte zu identifizieren, um die Lebenserwartung und –qualität vieler unserer Patienten verbessern zu können. Wir wollen deshalb die grundlegenden Mechanismen besser verstehen, die für die Etablierung oder Aufrechterhaltung einer chronischen Infektion notwendig sind.

18 Teilprojekte

Diesem langfristigen Ziel dient der hier beantragte Sonderforschungsbereich. Durch die Zusammenarbeit von 18 Teilprojekten soll an verschiedenen Beispielen von chronisch persistierenden Mikroorganismen verstanden werden,

  • wie sich chronische Infektionserreger im infizierten Wirt etablieren,
  • wie sie es schaffen, durch fortlaufende Adaptation ihres Genoms oder Modulation ihrer Genexpression langfristig im infizierten Wirt zu persistieren, und
  • welche Möglichkeiten ihnen zur Verfügung stehen, den Abwehrmechanismen des Wirts zu entkommen bzw. welche dieser Abwehrmechanismen essentiell für die Verhinderung oder Eindämmung einer Infektionen mit diesen Erregern sind.

Partner

Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft
Medizinische Hochschule Hannover
Helmholtz Zentrum für Infektionsforschung
Twincore

Beteiligte Gruppen

Sprecher

Professor Dr. Thomas F. Schulz (MHH)

Geldgeber / Förderer

DFG - Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft

SFB 51 - Roseobacter

Ökologie, Physiologie und Molekularbiologie der Roseobacter-Gruppe: Aufbruch zu einem systembiologischen Verständnis einer global wichtigen Gruppe mariner Bakterien

Die Roseobacter-Gruppe ist eine der Hauptentwicklungslinien der Familie der Rhodobacteraceae der Alphaproteobacteria. Ihre Vertreter bilden eine der häufigsten und erfolgreichsten Gruppen von nicht obligat phototrophen Prokaryonten in marinen Habitaten. Im Gegensatz zu der großen ökologischen Bedeutung ist das Wissen über diese Gruppe und ihrer Hauptakteure in marinen Habitaten immer noch überraschend lückenhaft. Konsequenterweise wollen daher marine mikrobielle Ökologen, bakterielle Physiologen und Biochemiker, Naturstoffchemiker, Genetiker und Informatiker aus den Universitäten Oldenburg und Braunschweig, des Helmholtz-Zentrums für Infektionsforschung (HZI), der Deutschen Sammlung für Mikroorganismen und Zellkulturen (DSMZ) und des Göttinger Genomforschungslabors im beantragten SFB/TR die Roseobacter-Gruppe vom Ökosystem bis zur Systembiologie von Modellorganismen bezüglich wichtiger Stoffwechselprozesse hin untersuchen.

Das Hauptziel ist, die evolutionären, genetischen und physiologischen Prinzipien zu verstehen, welche das Geheimnis des Erfolges dieser Bakteriengruppe ausmachen. Wie wird die genetische Konfiguration dieser Bakterien auf der Ebene der metabolen und damit zusammenhängenden regulatorischen Netzwerke so erfolgreich für rasche evolutionäre Anpassungen an so verschiedenartige Habitate benutzt?

Partner

 

Carl von Ossietzky Universität Oldenburg

Technische Universität Braunschweig

Helmholtz Zentrum für Infektionsforschung

Leibniz-Institut DSMZ-Deutsche Sammlung von Mikroorganismen und Zellkulturen GmbH (DSMZ)

Göttingen Genomics Laboratory

Beteiligte Gruppen

Es gibt keine Ergebnisse

Sprecher

Professor Dr. Meinhard Simon (Carl von Ossietzky Universität Oldenburg)

Geldgeber / Förderer

DFG - Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft

TRR 77

Leberkrebs - von der molekularen Pathogenese zur zielgerichteten Therapie

Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most frequent and dismal malignancies with so far limited therapeutic options but also an ideal model system for tumour research and the most relevant paradigm for virus-induced and inflammation-mediated cancer. Recent progress has demonstrated the feasibility of translating basic biomedical research findings into HCC therapy. The main aim of the SFB/TRR77 is to gain a profound understanding of the molecular basis of human hepatocarcinogenesis beginning with its initiation from chronic liver disease to its progression into metastatic cancer, its functional dissection and the identification of novel preventive, diagnostic, and therapeutic approaches.

Partner

 

Hannover Medical School

Heidelberg University Hospital

Beteiligte Gruppen

Es gibt keine Ergebnisse

Sprecher

Professor Dr. Peter Schirmacher (Universitätsklinikum Heidelberg)

Geldgeber / Förderer

DFG - Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft

SPP 1150

Signalwege zum Zytoskelett und bakterielle Pathogenität

In dem Schwerpunktprogramm wird das Zytoskelett als ein "Signal-responsives Kompartiment" bei verschiedenen zellulären Prozessen, bei der Signaltransduktion über extrazelluläre Signale und insbesondere als Zielstruktur einer Pathogen/Wirtszell-Interaktion untersucht. Dynamische Veränderungen des Zytoskeletts spielen eine entscheidende Rolle bei der Interaktion von mikrobiellen Keimen mit eukaryoten Wirtszellen und sind oftmals Voraussetzungen infektionsbiologischer Prozesse (zelluläre Mikrobiologie).
Im Schwerpunktprogramm werden Rezeptoren, Regulatorproteine und Signalwege bearbeitet, die in eine rasche, örtlich und zeitlich begrenzte Zytoskelettregulation eingeschaltet sind. Es werden die dynamischen Protein/Protein-Interaktionen der Zytoskelettkomponenten analysiert und Struktur-Funktionsanalysen beteiligter Signalmoleküle durchgeführt. Eine besondere Rolle kommt dabei Signal- und Schalterproteinen der niedermolekularen GTPasen (z.B. Rho-Proteine) und ihren zahlreichen Effektoren sowie direkten Regulatoren der Aktindynamik zu. Von Interesse sind insbesondere Signalwege und Regulatorproteine, die an Pathogen/Wirtszell-Interaktionen beteiligt sind und durch bakterielle Effektoren und Proteintoxine modifiziert und moduliert werden. Die experimentelle Vorgehensweise ist multi- und interdisziplinär und umfasst zell-, mikro- und strukturbiologische Ansätze mit dem Einsatz moderner Methoden der Proteininteraktionsanalyse, strukturanalytischer Techniken sowie gentechnischer Verfahren.
Ziel des Schwerpunktprogramms ist die Aufklärung der exakten Wege der Signal/Rezeptor-mediierten Zytoskelettveränderungen und ein besseres Verständnis der Zytoskelettdynamik bei Pathogen-Wirtszell-Interaktionen.

Partner

 

Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München

Medizinische Fakultät, Universitätsklinikum Magdeburg A. ö. R.

Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster

Medizinische Hochschule Hannover

Lehrstuhl Zellbiologie, Universität Konstanz

Universitätsklinikum Erlangen

Institut für Medizinische Strahlenkunde und Zellforschung
der Universität Würzburg

Leibniz-Institut für Neurobiologie Magdeburg

Helmholtz Zentrum für Infektionsforschung

 

Koordinator

Prof. Dr. Dr. Klaus Aktories (Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg)

Geldgeber / Förderer

DFG - Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft

SPP 1258

Sensorische und regulatorische RNAs in Prokaryoten

Eine der faszinierendsten Entwicklungen in der gegenwärtigen Biologie ist die Entdeckung einer rasch wachsenden Zahl von regulatorischen RNA-Molekülen. Das zentrale Dogma der Molekularbiologie besagt, dass die genetische Information von der DNA über die RNA zum Protein weitergeleitet wird. Entsprechend glaubte man, dass Proteine die wesentlichen strukturellen, katalytischen und auch regulatorischen Funktionen in einer Zelle übernehmen. Dieses Konzept wurde jedoch zunehmend in Frage gestellt, nachdem eine Vielzahl regulatorischer RNAs entdeckt wurde, die an der Kontrolle wichtiger physiologischer Prozesse beteiligt sind. Zum einen sind in den letzten vier Jahren eine enorme Zahl nichtkodierender kleiner RNAs (sRNAs) beschrieben, aber nur in wenigen Fällen genauer untersucht worden. Sie binden hochspezifisch an mRNAs oder Proteine und modulieren deren biologische Aktivität. Solche sRNAs können ganze Signalketten in zellulären Adaptations- und Differenzierungsprozessen steuern, den Virulenzstatus pathogener Bakterien bestimmen oder als echte "Masterregulatoren" der globalen Transkription wirken. Zum anderen stellte sich heraus, dass bestimmte RNA-Moleküle auch selbst als Sensor von physiologischen Veränderungen agieren. Erst vor wenigen Jahren entdeckte Riboschalter (Riboswitche) in bakteriellen mRNAs binden direkt und hochspezifisch wichtige zelluläre Metabolite. Dadurch ausgelöste Konformationsänderungen stellen die Expression der kontrollierten Gene entweder an oder aus. RNA-Thermometer arbeiten nach dem gleichen Prinzip, reagieren aber nicht auf chemische Signale, sondern auf intrazelluläre Temperaturänderungen, um die Expression von Stress- und Virulenzgenen zu kontrollieren. Im Schwerpunktprogramm wollen wir anhand von ausgewählten Modellorganismen folgende zentrale Fragen beantworten: Wie viele regulatorische RNAs besitzen Prokaryoten? Welche generellen strukturellen und funktionellen Merkmale lassen sich erkennen? Wie erreichen regulatorische RNAs ihre hohe Spezifität bei der Bindung von Zielmolekülen, seien es mRNAs, Proteine oder Metabolite? In welchem Umfang greifen die RNAs in die Kontrolle des zellulären Stoffwechsels ein? Wie wichtig sind sie für das Überleben unter verschiedenen Umweltbedingungen? Wo liegt das biotechnologische Potenzial von Riboschaltern? Weshalb benutzen Zellen regulatorische RNAs anstatt Proteine?

Partner

 

Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft

Projektleiter

Beteiligte Gruppen

Es gibt keine Ergebnisse

Sprecher

Professor Dr. Franz Narberhaus (Ruhr-Universität Bochum)

Koordinator

Professor Dr. Franz Narberhaus (Ruhr-Universität Bochum)

Geldgeber / Förderer

DFG - Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft

SPP 1316

Identification of host-adapted metabolic functions important for Yersinia pseudotuber­culosis virulence

Die Kolonisierung des Intestinaltrakts und das anschließende Eindringen in die intestinale Epithelschicht durch das Darmbakterium Yersinia pseudotuberculosis erfordert die Ex­pression von speziellen Virulenzfaktoren die beim Start der Infektion exprimiert werden. Hingegen werden für die anschließende Verbreitung, Persistenz und Vermehrung in tiefer liegenden Geweben andere Pathogenitätsfaktoren, z. B. die antiphagozytären Yop Effektor­proteine benötigt. Die Expression dieser Virulenzfaktoren wird durch ein komplexes Netzwerk von transkriptionalen und post-transkrip­tionalen regulatorischen Systemen gesteuert, die auch bedeutende metabolische Funktionen des Bakteriums kontrollieren. Unsere Studien zeigen, dass das Umschalten der Virulenzgenexpression besonders durch Veränderungen der Temperatur und des Nährstoffgehalts der Umgebung ausgelöst wird und mit einer glo­balen Veränderung des zentralen Kohlenstoffwechsels (Glykolyse, Krebs-Zyklus) und asso­ziierten Aminosäure- und Nukleosid-Stoffwechselwegen einhergeht. Um einen tieferen Ein­blick in den Wirts-adaptierten Stoffwechsel von Yersinia zu bekommen, soll in weiteren Arbeiten das gesamte Spektrum der metabolischen Veränderungen durch Virulenz-asso­ziierte Bedingungen (v.a. Veränderungen der Temperatur-, des Nährstoff- und Sauerstoff­gehalts) durch Metabolom, Fluxom, Transkriptom, sowie 13C-Isotopolog-Studien aufgeklärt. Zudem sollen die molekularen Mechanismen, die diese fein abgestimmte Koregulation von Virulenz- und Stoffwechselgenen ermöglichten, charakterisiert werden. Nachfolgend wird die in vivo Expression und Relevanz der identifizierten Stoffwechselwege für die Pathogenität der Yersinien im Mausmodell überprüft. Die dabei gewonnene Kenntnisse könnten zu Identi­fizierung neuer Angriffspunkte für neue antibakterielle Substanzen führen. 

Partner

 

Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft

Projektleiter

Beteiligte Gruppen

Es gibt keine Ergebnisse

Sprecher

Professor Dr. Michael Hensel (Universität Osnabrück)

Geldgeber / Förderer

DFG - Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft

SPP 1394

Physiologische Funktionen von Mastzellen

Mastzellen wurden lange Zeit für weitestgehend entbehrliche Zellen angesehen, die scheinbar ausschließlich für die lästigen und zum Teil sogar tödlichen Folgen einer allergischen Reaktion verantwortlich sind. In den letzten Jahren hat sich jedoch herausgestellt, dass Mastzellen außerdem eine entscheidende Rolle in der angeborenen Immunabwehr gegen Mikroben spielen, indem sie am Ort der Infektion Pathogene unmittelbar erkennen und als Effektorzellen zu deren Abwehr beitragen. Wir und andere haben die Mechanismen, durch die Mastzellen im Rahmen von bakteriellen Infektionen aktiviert werden, ausführlich charakterisiert und verschiedene Mastzellmediatoren identifiziert, die zum Schutz gegen die Folgen der Infektion beitragen.
Das Schwerpunktprogramm will nun Signale identifizieren und charakterisieren, die zu einer Optimierung der Anzahl und/oder Funktion von Mastzellen in Maushaut führen können. Hierfür werden umfangreiche in-vitro- und in-vivo-Untersuchungen durchgeführt, welche letztendlich zu einer verbesserten Immunabwehr bei bakteriellen Hautinfektionen führen sollen. Darüber hinaus wollen wir die Effektivität und Sicherheit einer solchen Behandlung in in-vivo-Untersuchungen an Mausmodellen bakterieller Hautinfektionen sowie allergischer Reaktionen und Autoimmunerkrankungen bestimmen. Die Ergebnisse unserer Untersuchungen sollen dazu führen, dass durch eine lokale und selektive Optimierung der Mastzellfunktionen in der Haut eine prophylaktische Therapie zur Vermeidung von bakteriellen Hautinfektionen erreicht werden kann.

Partner

 

Klinik für Dermatologie, Venerologie und Allergologie
Charité
– Universitätsmedizin Berlin

Universitäts-Hautklinik Eberhard-Karls-Universität, Tübingen

Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft

Projektleiter

Beteiligte Gruppen

Koordinator

Prof. Dr. Marcus Maurer (Charité)

Geldgeber / Förderer

DFG - Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft

FOR 629

Molekulare Mechanismen zellulärer Motilität

Das exakt geregelte Zusammenwirken von Motorproteinen, Biopolymeren und assoziierten Proteinen ermöglicht den intrazellulären Transport von Vesikeln und Organellen, Veränderungen der Zellform, die Zellmigration, die Bildung von Zelladhäsionskomplexen und weitere Aktivitäten der Zellmotilität. Die dabei entstehenden Multiproteinkomplexe sind hoch dynamisch und weisen eine außerordentliche strukturelle und molekulare Vielfalt auf. Innerhalb der letzen Jahre wurden erhebliche Fortschritte bei der Identifizierung und Charakterisierung einer Vielzahl mit dem Zytoskelett assoziierter Proteine erzielt. Um weitere Prinzipien zu entschlüsseln, die motilen Prozessen zugrunde liegen, wird es auch weiterhin notwendig sein, einzelne Proteine oder aus wenigen Proteinen rekonstituierte Modellsysteme mithilfe von biochemischen und strukturbiologischen Methoden im Detail zu untersuchen. Allerdings erfordert ein vollständiges Verständnis der komplexen Wechselwirkungen und Mechanismen, die für die Zellbewegung verantwortlich sind, zusätzlich die Einbeziehung zellbiologischer und molekulargenetischer Ansätze. Die Zusammensetzung der Forschergruppe ermöglicht ein Methodenrepertoire, das Kraftmessungen an einzelnen Motormolekülen, transiente Ensemblekinetiken, Röntgenstrukturanalysen, moderne mikroskopische Untersuchungen und molekulargenetische Ansätze einschließt. Als einfacher Modellorganismus wird Dictyostelium benutzt. Dazu ergänzend werden Untersuchungen an Zelllinien humanen und tierischen Ursprungs und genetische Experimente an der Maus durchgeführt. Untersuchungen an aktin- oder mikrotubuliabhängigen Motoren sind das primäre Ziel von vier Teilprojekten. Bei zwei Teilprojekten stehen Untersuchungen aktinbindender Proteine im Vordergrund. Dabei handelt es sich um den Mechanismus der WAVE-induzierten Aktivierung des Arp2/3-Komplexes und Untersuchungen zur Rolle der Formine. Letztere spielen eine wichtige Rolle bei der Ausbildung der Zellpolarität, der Zytokinese, der Bildung von Filopodien und der Zell-Zell-Adhäsion. Ein weiteres Teilprojekt befasst sich mit der Bedeutung der posttranslationalen Modifikation des alpha-Tubulins durch die Tubulin-Tyrosin-Ligase für die Ausbildung der Zellpolarität und den Einfluss auf aktinabhängige Bewegungsprozesse. Die molekularen Mechanismen des axonalen Transports in Neuronen stehen im Zentrum eines Teilprojekts, das sich mit der Wechselwirkung zwischen Mikrotubuli, Mikrotubuli-assoziierten Proteinen und Kinesin-Motoren beschäftigt.

Partner

 

Medizinische Hochschule Hannover

Projektleiter

Beteiligte Gruppen

Koordinator

Professor Dr. Dietmar J. Manstein (MHH)

Geldgeber / Förderer

DFG - Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft

FOR 1220

Prosthetische Gruppen - Transport und Insertion - PROTRAIN

Mehr als ein Drittel aller Proteine enthält prosthetische Gruppen, Metalle und Cofaktoren. Diese Gruppen sind essenziell für die Katalyse, da sie Teil des katalytischen Zentrums der Enzyme sind oder am Elektronentransport teilnehmen. Prosthetische Gruppen nehmen eine Schlüsselstellung ein für viele biologische Reaktionen, z.B. Photosynthese, Energiestoffwechsel, Sauerstofftransport, Anabolismus und Katabolismus, Redoxreaktionen, Signalling etc. Während man die Biosynthese vieler prosthetischer Gruppen gut versteht, ist es größtenteils unbekannt, wie prosthetische Gruppen zu ihren zellulären Zielen gelangen, ob sie nach der Biosynthese gelagert werden und wie sie schließlich den Weg zu ihren Zielproteinen finden. Komplexe Mechanismen müssen Verteilung, Transport und Insertion kontrollieren, da die meisten prosthetischen Gruppen sehr fragil und sauerstoffempfindlich sind.
Es muss daher eine Plethora von Transportern, Chelatoren, Metallcofaktoren, Faltungs-Chaperonen, Metall-Chaperonen, Carrierproteinen, Sammelproteinen und Insertasen geben. Das fein abgestimmte Zusammenspiel dieser Komponenten garantiert den sicheren Transport selbst durch Membranen sowie den Schutz und die Insertion der prosthetischen Gruppen in ihre Zielproteine. Diese komplexe Maschinerie ist völlig unerforscht, und es ist anzunehmen, dass ihre Komplexität der des Protein-Transportes in nichts nachsteht.
Auf der Grundlage unserer langjährigen Erfahrungen bei der Erforschung von Biosynthese und Funktion prosthetischer Gruppen konzentrieren wir uns in Braunschweig auf sieben Projekte zur Erforschung der molekularen Strategien für den Transport und die Insertion von Molybdäncofaktoren (Moco) und Häm-Gruppen in Enzyme. Ein breites Methodenspektrum wird eingesetzt, es reicht von genetischen über biochemische und Strukturansätze bis zu chemischen Synthesen und Bioinformatik-Ansätzen. Hauptziel der Forschergruppe ist es, folgende Fragen zu beantworten: (1) Was passiert mit den prosthetischen Gruppen Häm und Moco nach ihrer Biosynthese und (2) wie verläuft der Insertionsprozess dieser Gruppen in ihre Zielproteine? Wir erforschen die Einzelschritte dieser Prozesse, um ihre biochemischen, biophysikalischen und zellbiologischen Aspekte mechanistisch verstehen zu können. Wir streben nach der Ableitung grundsätzlicher Prinzipien, die es erlauben, derartige Prozesse auf dem molekularen Niveau sowohl in Bakterien als auch in Eukaryoten vorherzusagen.

Partner

 

Technische Universität Braunschweig

Beteiligte Gruppen

Koordinator

Professor Dr. Ralf R. Mendel (TU Braunschweig)

Geldgeber / Förderer

DFG - Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft

FOR 1406

Exploiting the Potential of Natural Compounds: Myxobacteria as Source for Leads, Tools, and Therapeutics in Cancer Research

Natural products play an important role in drug discovery and biomedical research for two major reasons: Firstly, they possess an enormous structural diversity serving as privileged scaffolds in drug discovery (leads) and secondly they have proven to be valuable tools for examining cellular processes and identifying targets in signal transduction pathways. However, besides this enormous potential of natural products, obstacles exist. These are mainly due to difficulties in isolation and/or synthesis in sufficient quantities and, consequently, to a lack of thorough investigations concerning their molecular mechanisms of action and their targets. Thus, the potential of natural products in pharmaceutical sciences is not yet fully exploited.
This Research Group (RG) will meet this challenge by exemplarily focusing on
natural products from myxobacteria: 1) novel species of myxobacteria will be
identified and screened for bioactive compounds. 2) innovative biotechnological/(bio)synthetic approaches will be used to guarantee compound supply as well as create analogs of them. 3) Innovative in silico approaches will help to define the mode of action of the natural compounds, and to design more potent analogs. 4) By combining chemistry with proteomics yet unknown targets of the natural compounds shall be identified. 5) Finally, with regard to anticancer pharmacology of the myxobacterial compounds the Research Group aims at attractive and promising avenues: We will not only focus on tumor death inducing effects of compounds, but also examine their influence on tumor cell migration as well as on cancer immunosurveillance and their underlying signaling pathways. Moreover, besides tumor cells, vascular cells and immune cells known to play a role in cancer survival are in the center of interest for respective pharmacological work. To this end complex cellular and in vivo systems as well as pharmacogenomics are employed for first line characterization of promising compounds instead of isolated target screening as
usually performed in industrial drug discovery.
Bringing together scientists with strong expertise in the field of biotechnology of
myxobacteria, pharmaceutical and natural product science, this Research Group will be a very important instrument for the support of “Drug Discovery from Nature”.

Partner

 

Helmholtz Institute for Pharmceutical Research (HIPS) Saarland

Saarland University

LMU Munich

Saarland University

ETH Zurich

TU Munich

University of Jena

 

 

Beteiligte Gruppen

Sprecher

Professor Dr. Angelika Vollmar (LMU München)

Geldgeber / Förderer

DFG - Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft

KFO 250

Genetische und zelluläre Mechanismen von Autoimmunerkrankungen

Das Ziel der Klinischen Forschergruppe ist es, ausgehend von genetischen Studien in Familien mit gehäuften Autoimmunphänomenen und gut charakterisierten Patientenkohorten über innovative Tiermodelle und aktuellste immunologische und genetische Ansätze die zellulärenMechanismen systemischer und organspezifischerAutoimmunerkrankungen zu entschlüsseln.

Partner

 

Medizinische Hochschule Hannover

Beteiligte Gruppen

Sprecher

Prof. Dr. Reinhold E. Schmidt (MHH)

Geldgeber / Förderer

DFG - Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft

Nanobiotec

Network for Research and Academic Training on Surface Biofunctionalization

Partner

 

Universidad Federal de Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, and various other universities in Brazil.

Beteiligte Gruppen

Es gibt keine Ergebnisse

Geldgeber / Förderer

Sonstige

Graduate Grant

Use of metabolites of Basidiomycotina fungi to modulate microbial biofilms

Beteiligte Gruppen

Es gibt keine Ergebnisse

Geldgeber / Förderer

DAAD - Deutscher Akademischer Austausch Dienst

Risc habitat megacities

Water, Health and Governance

Partner

 

UFZ Leipzig

FZK

DLR

GFZ

Beteiligte Gruppen

Es gibt keine Ergebnisse

Geldgeber / Förderer

Helmholtz

Graduate Grant of the Egypt Government

Diversity of microbial communities in biofilms growing on hexachlorohexane and related substrates

Beteiligte Gruppen

Es gibt keine Ergebnisse

Geldgeber / Förderer

Sonstige

Thai–German Symposium

1st Thai–German Symposium on Regenerative Medicine

Partner

 

Hannover Medical School (MHH)

GKSS Berlin-Treptow

FZK

University of Leipzig

University of Ulm

University of Regensburg

Charité Berlin

 

Beteiligte Gruppen

Es gibt keine Ergebnisse

Geldgeber / Förderer

DFG - Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft

DFG Graduate School

Functional biodiversity of Pseudomonas species in biofilm communities degrading polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

Partner

 

Hannover Medical School (MHH)

Technical University Braunschweig

Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby

Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen

Beteiligte Gruppen

Es gibt keine Ergebnisse

Geldgeber / Förderer

DFG - Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft

Microbial diversity

Studies of uncultured marine microbial diversity using biomolecule signature analysis and metagenomic libraries

Partner

 

National Centre for Cell Science

Pune University Campus, India

Beteiligte Gruppen

Es gibt keine Ergebnisse

Geldgeber / Förderer

DAAD - Deutscher Akademischer Austausch Dienst

DFG Graduate School

Carbon sharing of Pseudomonas spp. in a 4-chlorosalicylate degrading community (Pseudomonas Course of Lecture 3)

Partner

 

Hannover Medical School (MHH)

Technical University Braunschweig

Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby

Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen

Beteiligte Gruppen

Es gibt keine Ergebnisse

Geldgeber / Förderer

DFG - Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft

Biodiversity

Biodiversity and secondary metabolites of sponge-associated bacteria

Partner


Museu de Ciencias Naturais, Porto Alegre, Brazil

Beteiligte Gruppen

Es gibt keine Ergebnisse

Geldgeber / Förderer

BMBF - Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung

Biodiversity

Biodiversity and metabolic activities of oligotrophic biofilms

Partner


Universidade de São Paulo, Piracicaba, Brazil

Beteiligte Gruppen

Es gibt keine Ergebnisse

Geldgeber / Förderer

BMBF - Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung

Pathogene Mikroorganismen

Schicksal pathogener Mikroorganismen nach der Hochwasserkatastrophe der Elbe und der Mulde

Partner

 

UFZ

GKSS

Technologiezentrum Wasser (TZW) Dresden and Karlsruhe

Institute for Environment and Sustainability/ISPRA Joint Research Centre, Italy

Sächsische Akademie der Wissenschaften zu Leipzig

TU Bergakademie Freiberg, Institute for Mineralogy

University of Hamburg, Institute for Inorganic and Applied Chemistry, Institute for Organic Chemistry

Beteiligte Gruppen

Es gibt keine Ergebnisse

Geldgeber / Förderer

BMBF - Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung

Biodiversity

Assessment of the biodiversity of tropical fungi and their antibiotic activities

Partner


“Alejandro of Humboldt" Fundamental Research Institute for Tropical Agriculture (INIFAT), La Habana, Cuba

Beteiligte Gruppen

Es gibt keine Ergebnisse

Geldgeber / Förderer

BMBF - Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung

Bodenfunktionen

Organische Substanz und mikrobielle Diversität als Parameter der Steuerung wichtiger Bodenfunktionen

Beteiligte Gruppen

Es gibt keine Ergebnisse

Geldgeber / Förderer

Helmholtz

Diabetische Fußinfektionen

Metagenomics und Host-Pathogen Interactomics in diabetischen Fußinfektionen

Die Prävalenz von Diabetes mellitus hat in den letzten Jahren stark zugenommen und damit auch die assoziierten Komorbiditäten. Diabetische Fußulzerationen mit schwer heilenden Infektionen sind häufige und teure Komplikationen, die die Lebensqualität und die Überlebensrate dieser Patienten stark beeinflussen. Daher ist die frühzeitige und effiziente Behandlung diabetischer Fußinfektionen (DFI) von großer sozioökonomischer  Bedeutung. Schlecht heilende diabetische Fußinfektionen (DFI) sind häufig der Ausgangsherd für tiefe Weichteilinfektionen mit Osteomyelitis und stellen eine schwere Komplikation dar. Für den Patienten bedeutet dies neben chronischen Schmerzen auch die Gefahr von Beinamputationen und an septischen Komplikationen vorzeitig zu versterben. Um DFI frühzeitig behandeln zu können, ist es wichtig zu wissen, welche auslösenden Keime beteiligt sind. Dies ist jedoch sehr schwierig, da man von DFI meist eine polimikrobielle Flora isoliert, wobei bestimmte Keime mit den gängigen mikrobiologischen Methoden möglicherweise gar nicht detektiert werden. Um diese bakterielle Vielfalt zu erfassen, werden wir einen Metagenomischen Ansatz durchführen. Die schlimmste Komplikation bei DIF ist Osteomyelitis, die häufig chronisch verläuft, sehr schwierig zu therapieren ist und eine völlige Knochendestruktion zur Folge haben kann. Staphylococcus aureus ist der häufigste Auslöser von Osteomyelitiden bei DIF. Diese Form von Osteomyelitis erweist sich oft als therapieresistent; ein Problem, das durch das zunehmende Auftreten vonmultiresistenten Stämmen verstärkt wird, so dass S. aureus Osteomyelitiden eine zunehmende und schwere Komplikation bei Diabetespatienten darstellt. Ein genaues Verständnis der Interaktion dieses Pathogens mit Knochengewebe ist daher zentral, um neue Therapieansätze zu entwickeln. Hierzu werden wir globale Wirts-Pathogen-Transkriptom Veränderungen analysieren, die sich während Knocheninfektionen zeitgleich ereignen. Unser Ziel ist es, herauszufinden, welche bakteriellen Faktoren die Wirtszellgenexpression beeinflussen und vice versa (Interactom). Zusammenfassend kann man sagen, dass dieses Projekt wichtige Vorraussetzungen liefern soll, um die Prävention, Diagnose und Therapie von DFI zu verbessern und Langzeitkomplikationen zu verhindern.

Partner

 

Prof. Dr. Trinad Chakraborty, Institut für medizinische Mikrobiologie, Universitätsklinikum Gießen und Marburg

PD Dr. Rolf Daniel, Institut für Mikrobiologie und Genetik, Georg-August-Universität Göttingen

Prof. Dr. Eugen Domann, Institut für medizinische Mikrobiologie, Universitätsklinikum Gießen und Marburg

Beteiligte Gruppen

Koordinator

Dr. Eva Medina, Helmholtz Zentrum für Infektionsforschung, Braunschweig

Geldgeber / Förderer

BMBF - Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung

Mastzellen

Phagozytose-unabhängige anti-mikrobielle Aktivität von Mastzellen durch die Ausbildung extrazellulärer Netze: Beteiligte Zelluläre Rezeptoren und zugrunde liegende molekulare Mechanismen

In zunehmendem Maße werden Mastzellen als kritische Komponenten der Wirtsimmunabwehr gegenüber Pathogenen betrachtet. Wir konnten kürzlich einen komplett neuen Mechanismus aufdecken, durch welche Bakterien, wie Streptococcus pyogenes, Staphylococcus aureus oder Pseudomonas aeruginosa abgetötet werden. Hierbei werden die Bakterien in extrazellulären Strukturen eingefangen, die ähnlich den für Neutrophile beschriebenen extrazellulären "Netzen" sind. Diese sog. "mast cells extracellular traps" oder MCETs bestehen aus DNA, Histonen, Tryptase sowie dem anti-mikrobiellen Peptid LL-37. Die Ausbildung dieser MCETs ist nicht das Ergebnis einer passiven Freisetzung von DNA und granulären Proteinen während des zellulären Zerfalls, sondern ein aktiver und kontrollierter Prozess als Antwort auf spezifische Stimuli sowie der Produktion reaktiver Sauerstoff Spezies (ROS). Diese spezielle Form des Zelltodes wurde kürzlich als "Etosis" bezeichnet. Etosis ist weder eine Form von Apoptose noch der Nekrose. Sie ist charakterisiert durch die Zerstörung der Kernmembran begleitet von der Auflösung zytoplasmatische Granula und der anschließenden Vermischung von Kern- und Granulakomponenten im Cytoplasma, die dann von der Zelle freigesetzt werden.

Die Zielsetzung dieses Projektes ist es (i) die Rezeptoren auf den Mastzellen zu charakterisieren, die an diesem Prozess beteiligt sind, (ii) die Identifikation bakterieller Faktoren, welche die Bildung von MCETs beeinflussen, und (iii) die Charakterisierung der molekularen Mechanismen und Signalwege, die über die Bildung von ROS, zu dieser Form des Zelltods der Mastzellen führen.

Diese Erkenntnisse werden dazu beitragen, sowohl die anti-mikrobielle Aktivität dieser Zellen, als auch deren Beteiligung in der Wirtsimmunabwehr gegenüber Pathogenen besser zu verstehen.

Beteiligte Gruppen

Koordinator

Dr. Oliver Goldmann Arbeitsgruppe Infektionsimmunologie Helmholtz Zentrum für Infektionsforschung

Geldgeber / Förderer

DFG - Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft

S. aureus

Identifizierung genetischer Faktoren und immunologischer Mechanismen welche der Resistenz oder Suszeptibilität gegenüber S. aureus in Mausmodellen zugrunde liegen

Partner

 

Universitätsklinikum Münster (UKM)

Universität Kiel

Universität Bonn

Universität Tübingen

Universität Homburg

Universität Giessen

Beteiligte Gruppen

Koordinator

Prof. Cord Sunderkötter (UKM)

Geldgeber / Förderer

BMBF - Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung

IG-SCID

Indo-German Science Center for Infectious Diseases - Gemeinsam gegen Infektionskrankheiten

Infektionskrankheiten sind ein weltweites Problem. Jährlich sind sie für mehr als ein Viertel aller Todesfälle verantwortlich. Dabei schienen sie in der Mitte des 20. Jahrhunderts besiegt. Vor mehr als 120 Jahren entdeckte Robert Koch die Erreger von Milzbrand, Tuberkulose und Cholera. Eine neue Ära der Erforschung von Krankheitserregern brach an. Mit ihr stiegen sowohl die Lebensqualität als auch die Lebenserwartung. Die Entdeckung von Antibiotika und die Entwicklung neuer Impfungen ließ Mediziner und Forscher glauben, der Mensch habe den Kampf gegen die Krankheitserreger gewonnen. Aber Mikroben und Viren gaben sich nicht geschlagen: Antibiotika-Resistenzen, neue Varianten von bekannten Erregern und bisher unbekannte Krankheiten sind heute eine große Herausforderung für die Menschheit. Vermeintlich kontrollierbare Krankheiten wie Tuberkulose breiten sich wieder aus. Neue Infektionskrankheiten wie AIDS, SARS oder BSE tauchen auf. Viele Krankheiten, die scheinbar nichts mit Bakterien, Viren oder Pilzen zu tun haben – darunter auch einige Krebsformen – lassen sich ursächlich auf Infektionen zurückführen. Spätestens seit dem Auftauchen der "Neuen Grippe" im April 2009 sind sich viele Menschen der konstanten Bedrohung durch Infektionskrankheiten bewusst. Dabei sind die Strategien von Mikroben und Viren,  uns zu  infizieren, nicht weniger ausgeklügelt als die Strategien des Menschen, diese Krankheitserreger zu bekämpfen.

Wir brauchen dringend neue Medikamente und Impfstoffe. In den Industrienationen sind Krankenhauskeime und multiresistente Bakterien wie Staphylococcus aureus ein großes Problem. Tuberkulose und Hepatitis-Infektionen hingegen spiegeln das soziale Gefüge in der Welt wieder: Sie treffen arme Menschen am stärksten. Helfende Medikamente sind für viele unerschwinglich. Günstige Alternativen fehlen häufig. Infektionskrankheiten kennen keine Ländergrenzen und so sind Kooperationen von Wissenschaftlern verschiedener Länder ein wichtiger Schlüssel beim erfolgreichen Kampf gegen Krankheitserreger.

Das "Indo-German Science Center for Infectious Diseases" – deutsch-indisches Wissenschaftszentrum für Infektionskrankheiten – ist ein solcher Zusammenschluss. Von indischer Seite koordinieren das "Indian Council of Medical Research" (ICMR) und die Jawaharlal-Nehru-Universität (JNU) das Projekt, auf deutscher Seite die Helmholtz-Gemeinschaft Deutscher Forschungszentren und das Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung (HZI) in Braunschweig sowie die MHH Hannover. Diese deutsch-indische Kooperation ist ein virtuelles Zentrum, aufgebaut auf den Ideen der indischen und deutschen Forscher, die in gemeinsamen Forschungsprojekten zusammenarbeiten. Zwischen den Forschern findet ein reger Informationsaustausch statt. Regelmäßige Besuche und gemeinsame Kongresse sichern den Wissenstransfer. Das Ziel des Zentrums ist es, gemeinsam Infektionskrankheiten zu erforschen, sie besser zu verstehen und mit diesem Wissen neue Medikamente und Impfstoffe zu entwickeln. Beide Länder wollen damit ihre Zusammenarbeit auf dem Gebiet der biomedizinischen Wissenschaft ausbauen und stärken.

 

Der Weg zum Zentrum

Die wissenschaftlich-technologische Zusammenarbeit zwischen Deutschland und Indien begann bereits 1971 mit einem Abkommen über die friedliche Nutzung der Kernenergie und des Weltraums und wurde  1974 um die Zusammenarbeit in wissenschaftlicher Forschung und technischer Entwicklung erweitert. 30 Jahre später, im November 2005, bekräftigten beide Länder diese Kooperation. Die Helmholtz-Gemeinschaft Deutscher Forschungszentren (HGF) strebte eine Internationalisierung auf dem Gebiet der Gesundheitsforschung an, und als Teil der HGF hat das Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung (HZI) in den vergangenen Jahren die Zusammenarbeit mit Indien konsequent ausgebaut. Eine bedeutende Rolle hierbei spielt Professor Gursharan Singh Chhatwal. Der gebürtige Inder ist Leiter der Abteilung "Medizinische Mikrobiologie" am HZI in Braunschweig und schlug die Brücke zwischen Indien und Deutschland. Sein Forschungsschwerpunkt sind Streptokokken-Infektionen. Professor Chhatwal ist sich der Bedeutung seiner Forschung bewusst: Während in Deutschland eine Infektion mit Streptokokken wie zum Beispiel bei Halsschmerzen oder Scharlach mithilfe von Penicillin gut behandelbar ist, sind dieselben Streptokokken in Ländern wie Indien ein ernstzunehmendes Problem. Nicht vollständig ausgeheilte Infektionen und unzureichende Antibiotikabehandlung führen dazu, dass sich die Streptokokken im Körper einnisten. Die Folge sind Erkrankungen wie die rheumatische Herzkrankheit bei Kindern. Zurzeit leiden etwa 15 Millionen Kinder im Alter zwischen fünf und 15 Jahren an dieser Krankheit. Eine halbe Million sterben pro Jahr.

Die offizielle Geburtsstunde des „Indo-German Science Center of Infectious Diseases“ (IG-SCID) war der 23. April 2006. Der Direktor des ICMR, Professor Nirmal K. Ganguly, und der Präsident der HGF, Professor Jürgen Mlynek, unterzeichneten in Anwesenheit des indischen Premierministers Manmohan Singh und der Bundeskanzlerin Angela Merkel das „Memorandum of Understanding“, die Absichtserklärung auf eine enge Zusammenarbeit im IG-SCID. Mit der Zusage über ein Budget von insgesamt 1,5 Millionen Euro für einen Zeitraum von drei Jahren aus dem Impuls- und Vernetzungsfonds des Präsidenten der HGF erstellten das HZI und die Medizinische Hochschule Hannover im Februar 2007 zusammen mit dem ICMR ein Konzept für das gemeinsame Forschungszentrum. Bereits im April 2007 fand in Delhi die offizielle Einweihung des IG-SCID durch Professor Mlynek und Professor Ganguly statt, im Mai unterzeichneten das HZI und das ICMR schließlich das „Cooperation Agreement“. Im Oktober 2007 wurden die Aktivitäten des IG-SCID auf Kooperationen mit der Jawaharlal-Nehru-Universität (JNU) erweitert, verbunden mit einem weiteren „Memorandum of Understanding“ zwischen HZI und JNU. 

 

Forschungsschwerpunkte

Gemeinsam arbeiten die Forscher aus Deutschland und Indien im IG-SCID an verschiedenen Projekten. Sie untersuchen dabei sowohl die Wirts- als auch die Erregerseite. Ziel der Forschung ist ein besseres Verständnis von Infektionskrankheiten, die in Indien besonders problematisch sind. Mit dem gewonnenen Wissen wollen die Forscher neue Impfstoffe und Anti-Infektiva entwickeln.

Beispiel "Hepatitis": 12,5 Millionen Menschen in Indien sind mit dem Hepatitis C Virus infiziert. Bis heute gibt es keinen wirksamen Impfstoff. Ein Viertel der Infizierten entwickelt eine Leberzirrhose oder Leberkrebs. Welches sind die Gründe, die hierzu führen? Hinzukommt, dass in Indien vorrangig der genotyp3 des Virus vorkommt, während dies in westlichen Ländern meist genotyp1 ist. Die Variabilität des Virus spielt bei der Suche nach einem Impfstoff eine wichtige Rolle, damit dieser auch sowohl in Deutschland als auch Indien genutzt werden kann. Die Konstellation "Gleiche Krankheit – veränderter Virus" ist auch bei Hepatitis B ein großes Problem: So gibt es in Indien trotz einer Impfung 45 Millionen Menschen mit einer Hepatitis B-Infektion. Bei diesen Menschen zeigt der Impfstoff keine Wirkung. Das Ziel der deutsch-indischen Kooperation ist es, wirksame und günstige Medikamente zu entwickeln und die indische Biodiversität an Hepatitis-Erregern zu untersuchen.

Beispiel "Genetische Anfälligkeit": Auch die Gene des Wirtes spielen bei Infektionen eine wichtige Rolle. Während für den einen eine Grippe kein Problem darstellt, entwickelt sich beim anderen eine schwere Influenza. Das Projekt "GenetischeAnfälligkeit" untersucht genau dies. Bisher sind nur wenige Gene bekannt, die bei einer erhöhten Anfälligkeit gegenüber einer Erkrankung eine Rolle spielen. Langzeitstudien ermöglichen einen Blick auf die Zusammensetzung der Gene vieler Menschen. Mit ihrer Hilfe können genetische Faktoren identifiziert werden, die Patienten entweder widerstandsfähiger oder empfänglicher für eine bestimmte Krankheit machen.

Weitere Forschungsschwerpunkte des IG-SCID sind Leishmaniose, eine weitgehend vernachlässigte Krankheit, die die Haut und inneren Organe befällt, und Cholera. 90 Prozent der Fälle von innerer Leishmaniose sind auf fünf Länder beschränkt: Bangladesh, Indien, Nepal, Sudan und Brasilien. Dagegen ist die Cholera immer noch ein weltweites Problem, das auch in Indien allgegenwärtig ist. Die Weltgesundheitsorganisation nimmt an, dass nur zehn Prozent der Fälle gemeldet werden. Ein oraler Impfstoff ist zwar für Reisende verfügbar, jedoch kaum erschwinglich für den breiten Markt in Indien. Die Forscher suchen nach neuen Impfstoffkandidaten, die zu einem kostengünstigen Medikament weiterentwickelt werden können.

 

Ausblick

Nicht nur Erreger, die uns bereits infizieren, sondern auch solche, die es erst in Zukunft eventuell könnten, stehen im Fokus des IG-SCID . Von den 1.500 bekannten Mikroben, die Krankheiten bei Menschen auslösen, sind etwa 60 Prozent Zoonosen, also Krankheiten, die vom Tier auf den Menschen übergesprungen sind. Prominente Beispiele hierfür sind Vogel- und Schweinegrippe. In der Vergangenheit waren es HIV, Pocken, Pest und Masern. Ein globales Netzwerk aus Laboren, die die Expertise der westlichen Länder beinhalten, und ein internationaler Wissenstransfer sind notwendig, um zoonotische Erreger dort zu beobachten, wo sie vorkommen und sich zu neuen Bedrohungen für die Menschheit weiterentwickeln. Nur mithilfe von internationalen Forschungskooperationen wie IG-SCID kann in Zukunft der Kampf gegen Infektionskrankheiten entschieden werden.

Partner

 

Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR)

Jawaharlal-Nehru-Universität (JNU)

Helmholtz-Gemeinschaft Deutscher Forschungszentren

MHH Hannover

 

Beteiligte Gruppen

Geldgeber / Förderer

Helmholtz

Staphylococcus aureus

The Skin - barrier and target to Staphylococcus aureus: from colonization to invasive infection

Successful strategies of Staphylococcus aureus to colonize and invade the human epithelial barriers and its interaction with the microenvironment

Beteiligte Gruppen

Geldgeber / Förderer

BMBF - Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung

Human Nose Habitats

The Microbiota of the Human Nose Habitats - Metagenomic Analyses of their Composition and Dynamics

Beteiligte Gruppen

Geldgeber / Förderer

BMBF - Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung

Pseudomonas

Pathogenicity and Biotechnology (3d phase)

New Pseudomonas enzymes acting on 4-substituted but-2-en-4-olides on the third period of the International Research Training Group "Pseudomonas: Pathogenicity and Biotechnology"

 

AG Microbial Interactions and Processes has been participating since the beginning of this European Graduate

School (EGK) carrying out studies on Pseudomonas sp. strain MT1, a chloroaromatic degrader: In this phase the project is entitled:

New Pseudomonas enzymes acting on 4-substituted but-2-en-4-olides

Background and objectives:

4-Chloromuconolactone (4-carboxymethyl-4-chlorobut-2-en-4-olide) and protoanemonin (4-methylenbut-2-en-4-olide) are key intermediates in a 4-membered community degrading chlorosalicylate by a complex net of metabolic interactions and are subject to transformation by either a new type of hydrolase termed trans-dienelactone hydrolase (acting on 4-chloromuconolactone) or thus far unknown enzymes. The proposed project aims on elucidating the structure, mechanism and substrate specificity of the new type of supposedly metal-dependent hydrolase and on the characterization of the metal centers and on the elucidation of the metabolic pathway and enzymes involved in protoanemonin degradation.

Partner

 

Søren Molin, Michael Givskov, DTU Lyngby, Denmark

Beteiligte Gruppen

Geldgeber / Förderer

Sonstige

STREP

Biotool EC project

PD Dr. Dietmar H. Pieper, Head of the Microbial Interactions and Processes Research Group at HZI, is the coordinator of Biotool consortium, a European Commission funded project (STREP) under the Sixth Framework Programme, Priority 6: Sustainable Development, Global Change and Ecosystems. Code: STREP GOCE 003998

This project is a cooperative cluster of nine labs at leading research institutions from five different countries, aiming, through custom state-of-the-art genomic, proteomic and analytical technologies, the assessment, evaluation and prediction of natural attenuation processes to implement this technology as the accepted key groundwater and soil remediation strategy in Europe.

Beteiligte Gruppen

Koordinator

Dr. Dietmar H. Pieper (Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung

Geldgeber / Förderer

EU - Europäische Union

AMICO

Adaptation of Microbial Communities to Organic Contaminants in Oligotrophic Aquifers

AMICO EC project (Adaptation of Microbial Communities to Organic Contaminants in Oligotrophic Aquifers) was a consortium of nine European Labs. Code: QLK3-CT-2000-00731

Objectives: To explore the diversity, degradation capacity and resilience of the poorly known microbial communities in pristine and polluted subsurface aquifers, a comparison will be made between a set of logographic communities before and after exposure to a plume of pollutants. A combination of culture-dependent and -independent methods will reveal the functional and genetic characteristics of the communities involved in degradation of a selected range of contaminants (BTEX components) of the chosen aquifer. A detailed study of the genetic and physiological diversity, metabolic potential and adaptability in laboratory-scale model systems will demonstrate how the potential and performance of such communities may be optimised. This will eventually allow experimental manipulation of in-sit enhancement of bioremediation processes by making a rational use of the microbial diversity.

Beteiligte Gruppen

Geldgeber / Förderer

EU - Europäische Union

MAROC

Molecular Tools for Assessing the Bioremediation Potential in Organohalogen Contaminated Sites

Maroc EC Project (Molecular Tools for Assessing the Bioremediation Potential in Organohalogen Contaminated Sites), a consortium of 5 European labs, funded during the FP5. Code: EVK1-1999-00023

The objectives of this project were:

Characterisation of a representative number of sites concerning their pollution profile and metabolic potential by processing representative samples and data of contaminated sites.

Establish enrichment cultures to isolate a representative fraction of microorganisms with the desired metabolic potential.

Characterisation of the genetic information coding for the degradative potential of single isolates and mixed cultures.

Development of primers and probes, based on previously acquired data, and to verify their specificity using laboratory strains and new isolates and subsequent application of the primers to environmental samples.

Beteiligte Gruppen

Geldgeber / Förderer

EU - Europäische Union

ACCESS

Innovative approaches to understand complex microbial communities for eco-engineering the degradation of herbicides in stressed agricultural soils

Coordination of the ACCESS EC project: Innovative approaches to understand complex microbial communities for eco-engineering the degradation of herbicides in stressed agricultural soils. A consortium of nine labs from Europe and Latin America. Code: ICA4-CT-2002-10011


A project having as objective to generate a knowledge base for the rational eco-engineering of sites polluted with recalcitrant herbicides atrazine, 2,4-D and analogues.

Objectives:

To understand the roles of complex microbial communities for degradation processes, and adaptabilities of communities to stress conditions we will develop, based on detailed metabolic information, molecular biology tools, to study community functions, interactions and adaptations. Information recruited in model systems will be used in systems of increasing complexity, aiming at the rational manipulation and optimisation of degradative activities, including the contribution of rhizosphere microbial communities.

Beteiligte Gruppen

Geldgeber / Förderer

EU - Europäische Union

BIO4-CT972040

Rational design of formatted catabolic segments for engineering superior bacterial biocatalysts for degradation of chloro- and nitroaromatics

Coordination of the EC project BIO4-CT972040 (FP4): Rational design of formatted catabolic segments for engineering superior bacterial biocatalysts for degradation of chloro- and nitroaromatics. Code: BIO4972040.

 

Rationale:

The resistance of a variety of pollutants to biodegradation is caused by molecular bottlenecks such as incomplete pathways leading to the formation of dead-end or even toxic metabolites, inappropriate regulation of catabolic pathways or poor transformation rates. However, methods are now available for the construction of new and more effective pathways in order to obtain superior biocatalysts.

The purpose of this project is to identify and, eventually, to remove those biological bottlenecks that prevents biodegradation of recalcitrant pollutants and will focus on non-polar chloro- nitro and methyl-substituted benzenes and their metabolites. An adequate library of genes and enzymes appropriate for transformation will be isolated and characterised in detail. The development of a genetic toolbox for stable and predictable integration of isolated genes into selected host bacteria together with optimization of the performance of the isolated genetic elements will allow a rational assembly of these elements to create superior metabolic pathways.This will lead to microorganisms with increased catalytic potential and efficiency for degradation of xenobiotics, and a better survival in environmental settings.

The objectives of this project are (I) the detail ed genetic and biochemical analysis of catabolic elements as tools for the development of biocatalysts for the degradation of recalcitrant compounds, (2) optimization of the effectiveness of catabolic segments by changes in substrate specificity of critical pathway enzymes, the reconstruction of regulatory circuits and the development of specific tools for the stable assembly of optimised segments in appropriate hosts and (3) the development of new predictable bacterial strains able to mineralise previously recalcitrant pollutants under a variety of environmental conditions.

Beteiligte Gruppen

Geldgeber / Förderer

EU - Europäische Union

Biomercury

Worldwide remediation of mercury hazards through biotechnology Acronym

Mercury is a priority pollutant because of its extreme toxicity, global atmospheric transport and accumulation in the food chain. Its removal from current industrial emissions as well as from previously polluted sites is therefore mandatory. A unique biotechnological process for removal of mercury from wastewater based on the enzymatic transformation reactions of live mercury resistant bacteria has been developed at GBF, tested for 8 months at a German chloralkali plant and operated at a Czech chloralkali electrolysis factory in full scale for more than two years. This new technology is proven to be efficient, robust, environmentally friendly and cost effective. The aim of the specific support action BIOMERCURY is to

  • evaluate the applicability of the microbe based technology for clean-up of contaminated environments worldwide;
  • monitor the longterm performance of the first industrial microbe based mercury removal plant,
  • compare costs, safety and efficiency of the biotechnological approach with traditional methods;
  • transfer knowledge into developing countries where the problems are most urgent;
  • exchange information with US agencies.

These goals shall be approached by an international consortium which will first conduct case studies on hot spots of pollution as well as on current mercury emitting industries, taking into account technology offers. On this basis, integrated engineering concepts will be developed. They will be communicated to governments and International Agencies with the aim of implementing demonstration or remediation projects.

Partner

 

Technical University of Braunschweig

University of Southampton

GEOtestBRNO

University of Jerusalem

Technical University of Lodz

Jozef-Stefan-Institute

University of Tirana

Almaty Institute of Power Engineering and Telecommunications

University of Cartagena

Istituto de Ciências do Mar

Rutgers University

University of Florida

US Environmental Protection Agency

 

Beteiligte Gruppen

Es gibt keine Ergebnisse

Geldgeber / Förderer

Sonstige

Legionella Populationen von Süßwassersystemen in Deutschland, Palästina und Israel

Analyse der Ökologie und Virulenz von Legionella spp. Populationen von Süßwassersystemen in Deutschland, Palästina und Israel

Immunofluroszenzmikroskopie von Legionella pneumophila im Trinkwasserbiofilm.Immunofluroszenzmikroskopie von Legionella pneumophila (grüne Zellen) in Trinkwasserbiofilm (blau).Bakterien der Gattung Legionella verursachen wasserbürtige Infektionserkrankungen, die sich als schwere Lungenentzündung manifestieren. In Europa werden 70% aller Fälle von Legionellose durch Stämme von L. pneumophila Serogruppe (sg) 1, 20% von anderen Serogruppen von L. pneumophila und 10% von anderen Arten der Gattung Legionella verursacht. Im Gegensatz dazu werden im Mittleren Osten der Großteil dieser Infektionen durch L. pneumophila Sg3 verursacht.

Gesamtziel des Projektes

Das Gesamtziel des Projektes besteht darin, das gegenwärtige Wissen über die Ökologie von Legionellen in Süßwassersystemen zu erweitern, um die Umweltfaktoren, die ihr Vorkommen, ihre Virulenz und Infektiosität regulieren, und letztlich ihre Übertragung auf den Menschen zu verstehen. 

Integrierter, molekularer Ansatz

Wir analysieren hierzu die Hauptumweltfaktoren, die die Abundanz von Legionellen regulieren, wie Fraßdruck und assimilierbarer organischer Kohlenstoff. Wir werden einen integrierten, molekularen Ansatz benutzen, der im Einsatz von hochauflösender in-situ Diagnostik an Umweltproben und klinischem Material besteht, um das Vorkommen, die Aktivität und das Virulenzpotential von Legionellen-Populationen zu bestimmen.

Epidemiologische Daten

In Kombination mit umweltbasierten und molekularen epidemiologischen Daten zielen wir daraufhin, die Verbindung zwischen Ökologie und Populations-dynamik von Legionellen und dem Auftreten von Legionellose aufzuklären und vorzubeugen.

Partner

Projektleiter - Deutschland

Dr. Priv. Doz. Manfred Höfle
Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung
Abt. Vakzinologie und Angewandte Mikrobiologie
Inhoffenstraße 7, 38124 Braunschweig, Deutschland
Tel. +49 531-6181-4234

Palästina

Prof. Dr. Dina M. Bitar
Al-Quds University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Microbiology and Immunology
P.O. Box 19356, Jerusalem, Abu Dies, Palestine
Tel: +972 22799203

Israel

Dr. Malka Halpern
University of Haifa, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Department of Science Education - Biology
Oranim, Tivon, Israel, 36006
Tel.: +972 49838978

Projektleiter

Beteiligte Gruppen

Es gibt keine Ergebnisse

Geldgeber / Förderer

Sonstige

AQUA-CHIP

Development and validation of a DNA-chip technology for the assessment of the bacteriological quality of bathing and drinking water

Beteiligte Gruppen

Es gibt keine Ergebnisse

Koordinator

Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung

Geldgeber / Förderer

EU - Europäische Union

Soil

Soil organic matter and microbial diversity as parameters controlling important soil functions

Beteiligte Gruppen

Es gibt keine Ergebnisse

Geldgeber / Förderer

BMBF - Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung

Aquatic resources

System-integrated environmental biotechnology for remediation of organically and inorganically polluted aquatic resources

Beteiligte Gruppen

Es gibt keine Ergebnisse

Koordinator

Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung

Geldgeber / Förderer

BMBF - Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung

MARGENES

Marine bacterial genes and isolates as sources for novel biotechnological products

Beteiligte Gruppen

Es gibt keine Ergebnisse

Koordinator

Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung

Geldgeber / Förderer

EU - Europäische Union

Bacterioplankton community structure

Seasonal dynamics and controlling mechanisms of bacterioplankton community structure in the Western Mediterranean Sea

Beteiligte Gruppen

Es gibt keine Ergebnisse

Geldgeber / Förderer

EU - Europäische Union

Microbial ecology

Application of molecular methods for microbial ecology and biological safety

Beteiligte Gruppen

Es gibt keine Ergebnisse

Geldgeber / Förderer

EU - Europäische Union

Microbial diversity

Exploration of Microbial diversity

Beteiligte Gruppen

Es gibt keine Ergebnisse

Geldgeber / Förderer

EU - Europäische Union

Molecular RNA

Determination of successions of bacterioplankton in lakes by comparative analysis of low molecular RNA

Beteiligte Gruppen

Es gibt keine Ergebnisse

Geldgeber / Förderer

DFG - Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft

HRAMI 1

High resolution automated identification of microorganisms

Beteiligte Gruppen

Es gibt keine Ergebnisse

Geldgeber / Förderer

EU - Europäische Union

Listeria monocytogenes

Invasion by Listeria monocytogenes

The facultative intracellular human pathogen L. monocytogenes produces a distinct number of virulence factors, that usually mimic host cell processes leading e.g. to invasion and propagation within the host. In the past we have determined the high resolution crystal structures of internalins and internalin-like proteins from L. monocytogenes. Common to all these proteins is the presence of a so-called leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain that specifically interacts with host cell receptors during invasion. The structure of the complex between the receptor-binding domain of internalin A and the N-terminal domain of human E-cadherin (Schubert, 2002) provided a detailed picture of the first step of listerial infection in the human intestine. It also explained the known host tropism of L. monocytogenes towards humans but not mice. For further information and follow-up projects see this link.

Recently we have solved the structure of the complex between second listerial invasion protein InlB with its human receptor Met, the natural tyrosine kinase receptor of hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF), which initiates uptake of the bacteria by many different tissues. The structure shows that InlB predominantly interacts via its LRR-domain with the Ig1-domain of Met in constrast to HGF/SF which targets the N-terminal Sema-domain (Niemann, 2007). We are currently investigating how the InlB-Met-interaction leads to uptake of the bacteria by the host.

Beteiligte Gruppen

Geldgeber / Förderer

Sonstige

Y. enterocolotica

Type III secretion system chaperones and effectors

We are working on several components, effectors and chaperones of the Y. enterocolotica type III and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) secretion systems. For efficient secretion, type III secretion system effectors require specific  chaperone proteins that keep the effectors in a partially unfolded state prior to transfer through the injectisome.

 

After having solved the structure of the YopT chaperone SycT (Büttner et al, 2005) we recently solved the structure of SycD, which is responsible for translocator proteins showing a tetratricopeptide repeat fold (Heinz, 2007, in press) . 

 EPEC exploits the human adapter protein Nck as part of its infection strategy. During infection Nck specifically recognizes the phosphorylated translocated intimin receptor (Tir) which is inserted into the host membrane and eventually leads to dynamic bacteria-presen­ting protrusions of the plasma membrane known as pedestals. Using surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy, peptide epitope scanning and crystal structure determination of the Nck1 and Nck2 SH2-domains in complex with Tir-derived phosphopeptides we were able to investigate and differentiate the phosphopeptide binding affinities of Nck1 and Nck2 (Frese et al., 2006).

Beteiligte Gruppen

Geldgeber / Förderer

Sonstige

Biosynthesis

Enzymes of tetrapyrrole biosynthesis

The tetrapyrrole biosynthesis is a ubiquitous and central anabolic pathway leading to the formation of essential tetrapyrroles such as heme, chlorophyllandvitamin B12from simple precursors. In a long-standing collaboration with Dieter Jahn (Technical University Braunschweig) we are systematically investigating the structural and functional elucidation of enzymes belonging to this pathway.

Recent examples are the structures of coproporphyrinogen IX oxidase and aminolevulinic acid synthase.

The O2-independent coproporphyrinogen IX oxidase represents the first structure of an enzyme belonging to the ubiquitous family of "Radical SAM enzymes". Our future goal is to elucidate the catalytic mechanism of this complicated enzyme from structural studies, as well as site-directed mutagenesis and use of synthetic inhibitors (in cooperation with Markus Kalesse, University of Hannover/HZI). (Layer et al, 2006)

Finally we have solved and analyzed the crystal structure of aminolevulinic acid synthase, the first enzyme of tetrapyrrole biosynthesis in mammals and yeast, in complex with both substrates. Mutations in this enzyme lead to rare blood disorders and other diseases. With the structure of aminolevulinic acid synthase the structures of all enzymes of heme biosynthesis have finally been determined.  (Astner et al, 2005).

 Future research will focus on the catalytic mechanism and substrate binding of selected enzymes.

Partner

 

University of Hannover

Technical University Braunschweig

Beteiligte Gruppen

Geldgeber / Förderer

Sonstige

Nierenzellkarzinom

Charakterisierung des humanen Kinoms im Nierenzellkarzinom

Dieses Projekt demonstriert die Anwendbarkeit eines proteomischen Arbeitsablaufes zur bislang umfangreichsten Anreicherung und Charakterisierung von Kinasen und Phosphorylierungsereignissen aus ex-vivo Nierenparenchym und Tumorgewebe. Neben bereits bekannten Krebs- und RCC-relevanten Veränderungen an Kinasen und deren Phosphorylierungen konnten neue Kandidaten entdeckt und in physiologische Prozesse eingeordnet werden. Die Arbeit bildet daher den Grundstein für weitere Untersuchungen und trägt dazu bei, das Verständnis zum RCC, seiner Entwicklung und der beteiligten Signalwege zu verbessern.

Projektleiter

Beteiligte Gruppen

Sprecher

Dr. Susanne Freund (Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung)

Geldgeber / Förderer

Sonstige

Met-Signalweg

Phosphoproteom-Analyse des Met-Signalweges

Der humane Met-Signalweg spielt eine wichtige Rolle in der zellulären Antwort auf Wachstumsfaktoren. Nach der Stimulation durch den physiologischen Liganden HGF (hepatocyte growth factor ) löst der Met-Rezeptor eine Signalkaskade über Phosphorylierungen aus, die zu Zellproliferation, Motilität und Anti-Apoptose führt. Bei Krebs ist dieser Signalweg überexpremiert und führt zur Bildung von Metastasen. Das Oberflächenprotein Internalin B von Listeria monocytogenes kann ebenfalls Met binden und aktivieren, was zur Invasion des Pathogens in die Wirtszelle führt. Das Ziel dieses Projekts ist es, mittels einer phosphoproteomischen Studie die Signalwege unterhalb des Met-Rezeptors aufzudecken und den Einfluss von L. monocytogenes auf das Netzwerk zu verstehen.

Projektleiter

Beteiligte Gruppen

Sprecher

Evelin Berger (Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung)

Geldgeber / Förderer

Sonstige

HSV-Infektion

Mikrotubuli-abhängige Motorprotein-Dynamik bei HSV-Infektion

Viele Pathogene, wie das Herpes-simplex-Virus (HSV), missbrauchen das wirtszelleigene Mikrotubuli-Netzwerk und die damit assoziierten Motor-Proteine, um sich innerhalb der Wirtszelle fortzubewegen. Da das Rekrutieren von Motor-Proteinen an Mikrotubuli abhängig von der Tubulin-Tyrosin-Ligase (TTL) ist, könnte die Aktivität dieses Enzyms den intrazellulären Transport z. B. von HSV entscheidend beeinflussen. Ziel dieses Projektes ist die Charakterisierung des Interaktoms von Mikrotubuli und den damit assoziierten Motor-Proteinen in Wildtyp- und TTL-defizienten Zellen. Darüber hinaus sollen potenzielle TTL- und HSV-abhängige Motor- bzw. Adapter-Proteine validiert und funktionell charakterisiert werden.

Projektleiter

Beteiligte Gruppen

Sprecher

Björn Bulitta (Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforscher)

Geldgeber / Förderer

Sonstige

NK-Zellen

Proteomische Charakterisierung von definierten NK-Zell-Differenzierungsstufen

NK-Zellen sind zytotoxische Lymphozyten, die sich in definierte Subpopulationen unterschiedlichen Differenzierungsgrades unterteilen lassen, und zwar in Abhängigkeit von der Präsentation bestimmter Oberflächenmarker wie zum Beispiel CD56, CD57 und CD3. Ziel dieser Studie ist die proteomische Charakterisierung dieser unterschiedlichen primären NK-Zell-Subpopulationen aus humanem Blut, um Einblicke in deren Mechanismen der Zytotoxizität und Differenzierung auf molekularer Ebene durch die Nutzung quantitativer Massenspektrometrie zu gewinnen.

Projektleiter

Beteiligte Gruppen

Sprecher

Maxi Scheiter (Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung)

Geldgeber / Förderer

Sonstige

DUB

Neue aktiv basierte Sonden zur Charakterisierung von de-ubiquitinierenden Enzymen

Ubiquitin ist eine reversible posttranslationale Modifikation und in zahlreiche zelluläre Funktionen involviert. DUBs agieren als Gegenspieler der Ubiquitin-Ligasen und spalten kovalent gebundenes Ubiquitin wieder von den modifizierten Proteinen ab. Damit tragen sie zur Regulation vieler Signaltransduktionswege bei.
Durch die vielfältige Einbindung in die Regulation zellulärer Prozesse ergibt sich dadurch ein vielversprechendes therapeutisches Target. Wir entwickeln „activity based probes“ (ABPs), die reaktive Substratanaloga darstellen und damit die Anreicherung von aktiven DUBs und deren Charakterisierung ermöglichen. Diese Technologie erlaubt uns die Untersuchung des Ubiquitin-Systems in Infektionsprozessen und bietet signifikante Informationen für eine effizientere Entwicklung neuer Therapeutika.

Beteiligte Gruppen

Sprecher

Alexander Iphöfer (Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung)

Geldgeber / Förderer

Sonstige

Internalin B

Analyse des Signalnetzwerkes des Met-Pfades bei Aktivierung durch das Invasin Internalin B von Listeria monocytogenes

Ziel dieses Projektes ist die Charakterisierung humaner, zellulärer Signalwege, die bei der Zellinvasion durch Listeria monocytogenes mit Hilfe des listeriellen Oberflächenproteins Internalin B (InlB) beeinflusst werden. InlB interagiert dabei unter anderem mit dem humanen Met-Rezeptor, dessen natürlicher Ligand, der „Hepatocyte Growht Factor“, an zahlreichen zellulären Signalwegen beteiligt ist. Da 500 Proteinkinasen innerhalb unserer Zellen mit Hilfe von Phosphorylierungen nahezu jeden zellulären Signalweg steuern, werden nach Anreicherung der Kinasen in zeitaufgelösten Phospho-Proteomstudien gezielt die Kinasen untersucht, die durch Zellstimulation mit InlB  in ihrer Regulation beeinflusst werden. Im Anschluss werden diese Kinasen nicht nur im Hinblick auf ihre Rolle in der Zellinvasion durch Listerien, sondern auch hinsichtlich ihrer Funktion im ursprünglichen zellulären Met-Signalweg charakterisiert.

Projektleiter

Beteiligte Gruppen

Sprecher

Kirstin Jurrat (Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung)

Geldgeber / Förderer

Sonstige

Listeria

Ubiquitin und Ubiquitin-ähnliche Wirtsmodifikationen bei Infektionen mit Listeria

Obwohl bekannt ist, dass Ubiquitin und Ubiquitin-ähnliche Proteine während der Invasion von Listeria monocytogenes beeinflusst werden, sind die zugrundeliegenden Mechanismen nur bruchstückhaft beschrieben. Aus diesem Grund soll im Rahmen dieses Projektes ein systematischer, protein-basierter Ansatz entwickelt werden, um einen detaillierten Einblick in Ubiquiton-vermittelte Prozesse zu erlangen. In Kombination mit der nachfolgenden funktionellen Charakterisierung von gefundenen Protein-Kandidaten, kann diese Studie Angriffspunkte für die Abschwächung oder sogar Hemmung der  Zellinvasion durch Listerien  aufzeigen.

Projektleiter

Beteiligte Gruppen

Sprecher

Anne Kummer (Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung)

Geldgeber / Förderer

Sonstige

Cytomegalovirus

Die molekularen Mechanismen einer anhaltenden Antigenstimulation während einer Infektion mit dem Cytomegalovirus

Dieses Projekt basiert auf einen “Starting Grant” des Europäischen Forschungsrats (European Research Council, ERC), der unserer Gruppe 2011 verliehen wurde.
Das Cytomegalovirus (CMV) löst eine starke T-Zell-Antwort aus. CMV-spezifische T-Zellen stellen in Personen, die eine latent Infektion haben, die Mehrheit an Gedächtniszellen dar. Bis heute sind die Gründe für diese starke Antwort der T-Zellen unklar.


Das Ziel dieses Projects ist es, die molekularen Mechanismen für diese CMV-Dominanz zu beleuchten. Mithilfe eines Mausmodells und rekombinanten Maus-CMV untersuchen wir, wie virale Peptide Immunantworten auslösen und suchen nach Möglichkeiten, diese antigene Induktion zu unterdrücken.


Ein besseres Verständnis davon, wie das CMV T-Zellen aktiviert ermöglicht es, neue therapeutische Strategien zu entwickeln und CMV-Erkrankungen bei immunsupprimierten Patienten (z.B. bei Organtransplantationen) besser zu kontrollieren.


Außerdem könnte dieses Wissen dazu beitragen, das Potenzial der CMV auszunutzen und neue CMV-basierte Impfstoffe gegen andere Infektionskrankheiten zu entwickeln.

Beteiligte Gruppen

Geldgeber / Förderer

Sonstige

MZMV-Infektion

Kontrolle der chronischen MZMV-Infektion durch Interferone

Typ I Interferone (IFNs) werden während einer Neuinfektion von Zellen mit dem Maus-Zytomegalovirus (MZMV) gebildet. Die Anwesenheit von Interferon führt dabei zu einem drastischen Rückgang der viralen Vermehrung. Allerdings bleibt der Beitrag von Typ I Interferonen bei der Ruhe und Reaktivierung des Virus unklar.

In diesem Projekt soll geklärt werden, welche Rolle Typ I Interferone während der Ruhe und Reaktivierung von MZMV spielen. Hierbei könnten diese Interferone einerseits einen kontrollierenden Effekt haben; andererseits ist es denkbar, dass ihre Bildung und/oder Funktion durch besonders effektive Schutzmechanismen der Viren begrenzt wird. Die Untersuchungen werden sowohl im Mausmodell als auch in einem neuen in vitro Latenzmodell durchgeführt.

Beteiligte Gruppen

Geldgeber / Förderer

Sonstige

SFB 587: Teilprojekt B12

Untersuchungen zur Immunregulation bei akuter und chronischer CD4+ T-Zell-vermittelter Erkrankung der Lunge

Im Rahmen dieses Forschungsprojektes sollen neue Erkenntnisse zu den grundlegenden Mechanismen T-Zell-vermittelter Immunität und peripherer Toleranzinduktion bei Erkrankungen der Lunge gewonnen werden. Hierbei sollen im transgenen Mausmodell die autoreaktiven T-Zellen, die Antigen-exprimierenden  Typ II Epithelzellen und die pulmonalen Dendritischen Zellen näher charakterisiert werden. Zudem soll die Aufrechterhaltung und der Verlust von immunologischer Toleranz in der Lunge bei Infektionen untersucht werden.

 

Die mukosalen Oberflächen des Respirationstraktes stellen dünne und - aufgrund ihrer physiologischen Funktion des Gasaustausches - äußerst durchlässige Barrieren zwischen Körperinnerem und der Umgebung dar. Diese exponierte Lage bedingt, dass immunologische Reaktionen in der Mukosa einer hochsensiblen Regulation unterliegen, um angemessen auf inhalierte, harmlose, antigene Partikeln einerseits und gefährliche Pathogene andererseits reagieren zu können. Störungen in dieser sensiblen immunologischen Balance können zu schädlichen Immunreaktionen und zu Erkrankung führen.

Die zentrale Bedeutung von T-Lymphozyten bei Immunreaktionen der Lunge wird zunehmend erkannt, und es ist inzwischen akzeptiert, dass T-Zellen bei der Pathogenese verschiedener Lungenerkrankungen eine wichtige Rolle spielen. Obwohl die Bedeutung von CD4+ T-Zellen bei verschiedenen Erkrankungen der Lunge bekannt ist, sind die Mechanismen, die der Induktion und Regulation von CD4+ T-Zell-vermittelten Immunreaktionen in der Lunge zugrunde liegen, bislang nur sehr unvollständig verstanden.


Um T-Zell-abhängige Reaktivität gegen lungenspezifische Antigene besser zu charakterisieren und so das grundsätzliche Verständnis entzündlicher Prozesse in der Lunge zu verbessern, haben wir ein transgenes Mausmodell für eine CD4+ T-Zell-vermittelte Erkrankung der Lunge etabliert. Hierfür wurde eine transgene Maus generiert, die das Modellantigen Hämagglutinin (HA) unter der transkriptionellen Kontrolle des Surfactant Protein C (SPC) Promoters spezifisch in den alveolaren Typ II-Epithelzellen (AECII) der Lunge exprimiert. Eine Kreuzung dieser SPC-HA transgenen Maus mit einer Maus, die einen MHC Klasse II-restringierten T-Zellrezeptor spezifisch für das Hämagglutinin (TCR-HA) trägt, führt bei den doppelt transgenen SPC-HA x TCR-HA Mäusen zur Entwicklung einer autoimmun-vermittelten, progressiven interstitiellen Pneumonitis. Aus unseren bisherigen Forschungsergebnissen zur funktionellen Charakterisierung autoreaktiver CD4+ T-Zellen haben wir fundierte Hinweise auf die Induktion regulatorischer T-Zellen (Tregs) bei chronischer Antigenstimulation in der Lungenschleimhaut gewonnen.

 

Im Rahmen des SFB 587-geförderten Projektes sollen neue Erkenntnisse zu den grundlegenden Mechanismen T-Zell-vermittelter Immunität und peripherer Toleranzinduktion bei Erkrankungen der Lunge gewonnen werden. Hierbei bildet die umfassende Charakterisierung des AECII – T-Zell – Crosstalks in der Lunge einen Schwerpunkt unserer Forschungsaktivitäten. Eine umfangreiche Charakterisierung der pulmonalen autoreaktiven CD4+ T-Zellen hat ergeben, dass chronische Antigenstimulation in der Lungenschleimhaut zur Induktion Foxp3+ regulatorischer T-Zellen führt. Unsere Untersuchungen zur Beteiligung der AECII an entzündlichen Prozessen in der Lunge haben gezeigt, dass die Erkennung des Selbstantigens durch CD4+ T-Zellen zu massiven Veränderungen im AECII-Genexpressionsprofil führt. Des Weiteren konnten wir zeigen, dass diese Zellen wichtige Funktionen bei der Induktion und Regulation T-Zell-vermittelter Entzündung in der Lunge aufweisen. In vitro Experimente belegen, dass AECII aus der erkrankten Lunge vermehrt Faktoren sekretieren, die die T-Zellproliferation inhibieren und die Induktion regulatorischer T-Zellen fördern. Zudem untersuchen wir in diesem Mausmodell für T-Zellvermittelte Entzündung der Lunge den Einfluss von Infektionen auf die Aufrechterhaltung und den Verlust von immunologischer Toleranz in der Lunge. Ziel ist ein besseres Verständnis der komplexen immunologischen Mechanismen, die zum Verlust von Selbsttoleranz bei Infektionen in der Lunge führen können. Eine bessere Kenntnis der Pathomechanismen bei chronischen Erkrankungen der Lunge sowie bei Infektionen stellt die Grundlage für eine gezielte therapeutische Modulation der mukosalen Immunantwort dar.

 

Projektleiter

Beteiligte Gruppen

Sprecher

Prof. Dr. med. Gesine Hansen (MHH)

Geldgeber / Förderer

DFG - Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft

HCC

Zelluläre Immuntherapie der HCV-Infektion durch HCV-verursachtes HCC

Weltweit sind derzeit mehr als 170 Millionen Menschen chronisch mit dem Hepatitis C-Virus (HCV) infiziert. Akute HCV-Infektionen verlaufen üblicherweise asymptomatisch, wobei jedoch 50 bis 90 Prozent der infizierten Patienten nicht in der Lage sind, das Virus erfolgreich zu eliminieren und folglich eine chronische Infektion entwickeln. Diese führt nicht selten zu Leberzirrhose und zur Entwicklung von Leberkrebs. Trotz dieses enormen medizinischen Problems gibt es derzeit nur äußerst begrenzte Therapiemöglichkeiten und noch keinen Impfstoff gegen HCV.

Im Rahmen des von der HGF geförderten Forschungsprojektes entwickeln wir eine auf dendritischen Zellen (DCs) basierende Immuntherapie gegen das HCV. Diese beruht auf dem in vivo Targeting von Antigenen zu reifenden DCs. DCs fungieren als eine Art „molekularer Schalter“ im Immunsystem. Während die Aktivierung von T-Zellen durch unreife DCs zur Entwicklung von T-Zelltoleranz führt, induzieren reife DCs eine robuste T-Zellantwort, die essentiell für die Eliminierung des HCV ist. Um HCV-spezifische Antigene in DCs einzuschleusen, koppeln wir ausgewählte virale Antigene an einen Antikörper gegen den Endozytose-Rezeptor DEC-205, der auf der Oberfläche von DCs exprimiert wird. Die Verabreichung dieses Antikörper-Antigen-Komplexes in Kombination mit DC-aktivierenden Substanzen führt zur Aktivierung HCV-spezifischer T-Zellantworten. Da es derzeit keine geeigneten Kleintiermodelle für HCV-Infektionen gibt, testen wir die Effektivität dieser Immuntherapie mittels Surrogat-Infektionen in Mäusen.

Beteiligte Gruppen

Es gibt keine Ergebnisse

Geldgeber / Förderer

Helmholtz

Influenzapneumonie

Rolle der alveolaren Typ II-Epithelzellen und des Toll-like Rezeptor 7 für die erhöhte Suszeptibilität gegenüber bakterieller Superinfektion bei Influenzapneumonie

Eine retrospektive Untersuchung der Spanischen Grippe von 1918/19, einer hinsichtlich der Zahl ihrer Opfer und der weltweiten Verbreitung einzigartigen Pandemie, hat ergeben, dass die überwiegende Mehrheit der Opfer nicht an den primären Folgen der Infektion mit dem Influenza A-Virus (IAV) verstarb, sondern an einer außergewöhnlich hohen Rate bakterieller Superinfektionen, insbesondere mit Streptococcus pneumoniae. Dies gilt auch für spätere Grippe-Pandemien in den 1950er und 1960er Jahren und auch für die kürzlich beendete Schweinegrippe-Pandemie. Die erhöhte Anfälligkeit (Suszeptibilität) gegenüber bakteriellen Infektionen nach einer IAV-Infektion findet man auch im Mausmodell. Wir haben in der Vergangenheit erfolgreich ein solches Tiermodell für die IAV – S. pneumoniae – Superinfektion etabliert, in dem wir zeigen konnten, dass IAV-infizierte Mäuse deutlich häufiger infolge einer Sepsis nach einer S. pneumoniae-Infektion versterben als nicht IAV-infizierte Mäuse. Die Mechanismen, die der transienten immunologischen Reaktionsunfähigkeit gegenüber bakteriellen Erregern zugrunde liegen, sind weitgehend unklar.

Die Oberfläche des Respirationstraktes ist eine dünne und äußerst durchlässige Barriere zwischen Körperinnerem und der Umgebung. Während die Rolle des Epithels ursprünglich auf diese Barrierefunktion reduziert wurde, haben Arbeiten der vergangenen Jahre zunehmend gezeigt, dass Alveolar-Epithelzellen (AEC) eine Vielzahl immunologisch bedeutender Funktionen aufweisen und eine wichtige Verbindung zum adaptiven Immunsystem darstellen. Ob die durch IAV-Infektion veränderte Physiologie von alveolaren Typ II-Epithelzellen (AECII) eine Rolle bei der bakteriellen Superinfektion spielt - entweder durch immunologische Überaktivierung oder Immunsuppression - ist jedoch weitestgehend unverstanden.

Wir untersuchen aktuell, inwiefern die durch IAV-Infektion veränderte Physiologie von AECII eine Rolle für die erhöhte Suszeptibilität gegenüber S. pneumoniae-Infektionen spielt. In diesem Kontext soll auch die Funktion des Toll-like Rezeptors 7, dessen Aktivierung antimikrobielle Funktionen in IAV-infizierten Zellen einleitet, näher charakterisiert werden. Basierend auf umfangreichen Transkriptomanalysen von AECII vor und nach einer IAV-Infektion soll ein umfassender Einblick in die Virus-induzierten Veränderungen im genetischen Programm und immunologischen Profil dieser Zellen gewonnen werden. Damit verbindet sich die Hoffnung, neue therapeutische Optionen für künftige Influenza-Pandemien zu erhalten.

Beteiligte Gruppen

Es gibt keine Ergebnisse

Geldgeber / Förderer

DFG - Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft

Mucosal

Mucosal vaccination

The optimization of the immunogenicity of antigens delivered by the mucosal route is a main priority, since mucosal vaccination leads to the stimulation of immune responses at the sites where the first line of defense against infections is laid. This results in protection not only against disease, but also against infection (i.e. colonization), thereby reducing the risk of horizontal transfer from infected individuals to susceptible hosts.

Therefore, this project focuses on the development of new adjuvants, which are amenable for mucosal vaccination. Their underlying mechanisms of action are elucidated to facilitate the fine tuning of the elicited responses, as well as to assess the potential risk of side effects associated with their use in humans. The most promising candidates are been exploited for the development of vaccine candidates against specific diseases.

Beteiligte Gruppen

Geldgeber / Förderer

Sonstige

HIS mice

Improving predictability of preclinical data

To increase predictability of the success rates of vaccine and drug candidates transferred into the clinic, advanced animals models are being established that would allow a cost-efficient screening, selection and prioritization of different candidates and formulations.

The goal of this project is to create small animal models based on humanized mice for testing vaccines and drugs against pathogens with tropism for human cells. Specifically, we aim to generate mice with a functional human immune system (HIS), functional human liver cells (HuHep) or harboring both tissues (HIS-HuHep). These three humanized mouse models will allow us to identify vaccine and drug candidates against lymphotropic (e.g., HIV) and hepatotropic (e.g. HCV, HBV) pathogens. The humanized animals would represent a valuable technology platform not only for a robust preclinical evaluation of the immunogenicity, efficacy and safety of products aimed at treating diseases with highly predictive value for humans, but also for the generation of human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that can be used for therapeutic and diagnostic purposes.

Beteiligte Gruppen

Geldgeber / Förderer

Sonstige

HCVAX

Novel vaccines against Hepatitis C using nanotechnology

Anti-viral treatments against hepatitis C virus (HCV) suffer from many disadvantages, and infections usually become chronic. While an efficient anti-HCV vaccine would help alleviate the problems of this disease, such a vaccine does not yet exist. Thus, the goal of the HCVAX consortium, which is funded by the EuroNanoMed Joint Transnational Initiative of the European Union is to develop such a vaccine. 

The HCVAX vaccines are generated from innovative, biocompatible nanogels carrying RNA-replicon vaccines. The latter are modified swine fever virus genomes - incapable of infecting human cells as a biosafety measure – encoding HCV antigens, yet unable to generate infectious virus. For focused vaccine delivery, the nanogel carrier is designed to target and introduce the RNA replicon cargo into dendritic cells, the pivotal cells for inducing efficient immune responses. Further, innovative adjuvants will be screened for increasing the efficacy of these vaccines. Briefly, we will test adjuvants emerging from our pipeline in combination with the nanogels and replicons for their capacity to direct the Nanogel carrier to dendritic cells and to modify and optimize the elicited immune responses as needed for  effective vaccination against HCV.

Promising formulations will be identified through in vitro screening assays, and evaluated pre-clinically in vivo, to prioritize them for clinical development.

Beteiligte Gruppen

Koordinator

Dr. Kenneth C. McCullough, Institute of Virology and Immunoprophylaxis Mittelhäusern, Switzerland

Geldgeber / Förderer

BMBF - Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung

Rebirth

Tolerance for Translation of Regenerative Therapy

The goal of the Excellence Initiative REBIRTH (Regenerative Biology and Reconstructive Therapies) is to strengthen cutting-edge research in Germany and to improve its international competitiveness establishing an internationally visible scientific network for regenerative medicine relating to the heart, blood, lungs and liver. Within this cluster a research area is designed to identify new molecular targets for therapeutic interventions and proof-of-principle of new regenerative therapies in non-clinical models. In this context, researchers are also improving technologies required for the generation, delivery and biosafety monitoring of regenerative drugs and advanced therapeutic medicinal products (ATMPs; i.e. cell therapy, gene therapy and tissue engineering). The developed models cover lymphohaematopoietic, cardiac, pulmonary, he­patic and endocrine (diabetes mellitus) diseases. Furthermore, modes of inducing tolerance and regenerating immunity in conditions of undue tolerance (i.e. cancer) were also investigated. Therefore, one of our most important goals is the identification of compounds facilitating or inhibiting the de novo generation of Treg as well as acting on existing Treg. To this end, in vitro screenings will be performed based on DC, Tregs and effector CD4 and CD8 T cells derived from WT and transgenic animals. Immunomodulators will be exploited to address the specific needs of activities within the Tolerance Group, as well as in other external REBIRTH subprojects. Another important goal is the improvement of the humanized mouse model (HIS) in order to increase the predictive value of preclinical studies. The resulting enhanced models will be exploited in the context of other REBIRTH subprojects.

Chagas disease

Development and testing of prophylactic and therapeutic vaccine candidates against Chagas disease

Chagas disease is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi and affects 16-18 million people in Central and Latin America, leading to chronic disease with severe incapacitation. It is characterized by an acute phase followed by an indeterminate stage that can last for years without signs or symptoms. Nearly 30% of patients’ progress to a chronic phase in which different types of pathology appear. Chemotherapy of Chagas disease has limited efficacy and is not innocuous. Recent studies suggest that parasite persistent infection is responsible for chronic manifestations, suggesting the importance of developing prophylactic or therapeutic vaccines. However, certain candidate antigens (Ag) seem to be involved in immune escape. Due to the natural infection cycle and logistic constraints, it would be a plus to develop a mucosal vaccine. Different antigens from this parasite will be used to develop mucosal vaccine formulations, which will be tested for immunogenicity to select appropriate Ag combinations or to design chimeric proteins based on Ag domains lacking immune evasion properties. The efficacy of the resulting candidates will be assessed in acute and chronic infection models.

This project is funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) and the Ministerio de Ciencias, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (MINCYT).

Beteiligte Gruppen

Geldgeber / Förderer

BMBF - Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung

DruckenPer Mail versendenTeilen